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California Conservatorship Practice

No other source matches the thorough, practice-oriented treatment in this book.

"I think this guide is superb; I use my copy of it all the time. The OnLAW version is especially convenient because I can access it anywhere with my tablet or laptop."
Thomas P. Feledy, Esq., Sole Practitioner, San Carlos

No other source matches the thorough, practice-oriented treatment in this book.

  • Determining need for conservatorship
  • Initiating temporary and general conservatorship proceedings
  • Conservator's duties and responsibilities
  • Fixing the residence and making medical decisions
  • Filing accountings
  • Estate management
  • Legal capacity of the conservatee
  • Representing the conservatee
  • Limited and LPS conservatorships
  • Terminating conservatorships
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Print ES33520

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"I think this guide is superb; I use my copy of it all the time. The OnLAW version is especially convenient because I can access it anywhere with my tablet or laptop."
Thomas P. Feledy, Esq., Sole Practitioner, San Carlos

No other source matches the thorough, practice-oriented treatment in this book.

  • Determining need for conservatorship
  • Initiating temporary and general conservatorship proceedings
  • Conservator's duties and responsibilities
  • Fixing the residence and making medical decisions
  • Filing accountings
  • Estate management
  • Legal capacity of the conservatee
  • Representing the conservatee
  • Limited and LPS conservatorships
  • Terminating conservatorships

1

Is a Conservatorship Needed?

Margaret M. Hand

Julie R. Woods

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  1.1
    • A.  What Is a Conservatorship and Who Is It For?  1.2
    • B.  Effect of Establishment of a Conservatorship  1.3
    • C.  Can the Attorney Help? The Attorney’s Ethical Obligations
      • 1.  Representing the Petitioner  1.4
      • 2.  Avoiding Conflicting Representations  1.5
      • 3.  Attorney as Petitioner  1.6
      • 4.  Attorney as Conservator  1.7
  • II.  IS A CONSERVATORSHIP THE ANSWER?  1.8
    • A.  Does the Proposed Conservatee Lack Capacity?
      • 1.  Analysis Under DPCDA  1.9
        • a.  Deficits in Mental Function Required  1.10
        • b.  Deficits Must Impair Ability to Act; Isolated Incidents Are Not Enough  1.11
        • c.  Doctor’s Diagnosis and Opinion  1.12
      • 2.  Does the Proposed Conservatee Lack Capacity to Give Informed Consent to Medical Treatment?  1.13
    • B.  Is the Person Subject to Fraud or Undue Influence?  1.14
    • C.  Are There Alternatives?  1.15
      • 1.  Voluntary Acceptance of Informal or Formal Assistance  1.16
      • 2.  Advance Planning for Incapacity  1.17
        • a.  Durable Powers of Attorney  1.18
          • (1)  Durable Powers of Attorney for Financial Management  1.19
          • (2)  Advance Health Care Directives  1.20
        • b.  Trusts
          • (1)  Trust as Estate Planning Instrument  1.21
          • (2)  Limitations of Trust If Settlor/Trustee Lacks Capacity  1.22
      • 3.  Conservatorship Alternatives in the Absence of Advance Planning  1.23
        • a.  Medical Interdisciplinary Team Review  1.24
        • b.  Management and Control of Community Property
          • (1)  Spouse With Capacity: Right of Each Spouse to Manage and Control  1.25
          • (2)  Management and Control of Employee and Retirement Plans  1.26
          • (3)  Fiduciary Duties Apply to Each Spouse  1.27
        • c.  Petition for Single Community Property Transaction When One Spouse Is Incapacitated  1.28
        • d.  Petition to Authorize Medical Treatment Under Prob C §3201  1.29
        • e.  Joint Tenancies  1.30
    • D.  Prefiling Investigation by Public Guardian  1.30A
  • III.  CHOICE OF PROPOSED CONSERVATOR  1.31
    • A.  Can the Proposed Conservator Post Bond?  1.32
    • B.  Is Appointment of the Proposed Conservator in the Proposed Conservatee’s Best Interests?  1.33
    • C.  Should There Be More Than One Conservator?
      • 1.  Co-Conservators  1.34
      • 2.  Conservator of the Person and Conservator of the Estate  1.35
    • D.  Has a Conservator Been Nominated?
      • 1.  Has the Conservatee Nominated a Conservator?  1.36
      • 2.  Has Someone Besides the Conservatee Nominated a Conservator?  1.37
    • E.  Does the Proposed Conservator Have Priority of Appointment?  1.38
      • 1.  Effect of Pending Proceeding for Marriage Dissolution, Annulment, Separate Maintenance, or Nullity  1.39
      • 2.  Effect of Termination of Domestic Partnership or Intent to Terminate Domestic Partnership  1.40
    • F.  Is a Trust Company the Best Choice?  1.41
    • G.  Is a Professional Conservator the Best Choice?  1.42
    • H.  Is the Public Guardian the Best Choice?  1.43
    • I.  Is a Nonprofit Charitable Organization the Best Choice?  1.44
    • J.  Is It Practical to Have a Nonresident of California Serve?  1.45
  • IV.  WHO SHOULD BE THE PETITIONER?  1.46

2

Court-Approved Substitutes for Probate Conservatorship

Samuel D. Ingham III

  • I.  ALTERNATIVE COURT PROCEEDINGS TO PROBATE CONSERVATORSHIP  2.1
  • II.  PROCEEDING FOR A PARTICULAR TRANSACTION INVOLVING COMMUNITY PROPERTY  2.2
    • A.  Petition to Determine Legal Capacity  2.3
      • 1.  Substantial Inability to Manage or Control Community Property  2.4
      • 2.  Lack of Capacity for a Particular Transaction  2.5
    • B.  Petition to Authorize Particular Transaction Involving Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner Who Lacks Legal Capacity and Has No Conservator  2.6
      • 1.  Types of Transactions  2.7
      • 2.  Who May File or Join in Petition  2.8
      • 3.  Venue: Residence of Either Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner or Best Interest  2.9
      • 4.  Petition Contents
        • a.  Allegations Required in All Cases  2.10
        • b.  Additional Allegations When Petition Seeks Order Authorizing Transaction (Prob C §3101(a))  2.11
        • c.  Additional Allegations When Petition Includes Request to Authorize Creation of Trust  2.12
        • d.  Additional Allegations When Petition Seeks Declaration of Legal Capacity (Prob C §3101(b))  2.13
      • 5.  Form: Petition for Determination That Husband/Wife Lacks Capacity to Join in or Consent to Proposed Transaction and for Authorization to Execute and Fund Revocable Trust and to Make Federal Gift Tax Annual Exclusion Gifts  2.14
      • 6.  Citation or Notice to Nonpetitioning Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner  2.15
      • 7.  Other Notice Requirements  2.16
      • 8.  Safeguards for Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner Alleged to Lack Legal Capacity
        • a.  Representation of Petitioning Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner  2.17
          • (1)  Practical Considerations  2.18
          • (2)  Attorney Fees  2.19
        • b.  Representation of Nonpetitioning Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner  2.20
        • c.  Appointment of Investigator  2.20A
        • d.  Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner Alleged to Lack Capacity Must Be Present at Hearing  2.21
        • e.  Court Must Inform Spouse or Registered Domestic Partner of Possible Result of Proceeding and of Right to Counsel  2.22
      • 9.  Order Declaring Legal Capacity and Authorizing Transaction
        • a.  Order Regarding Legal Capacity  2.23
        • b.  Findings Required for Order Authorizing Transaction  2.24
        • c.  Bond  2.25
      • 10.  Completion of Transaction  2.26
      • 11.  Failure to Complete Transaction  2.27
    • C.  Proceeding May Include Determination of Character of Property  2.28
  • III.  AUTHORIZATION FOR MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR ADULT WITHOUT CONSERVATOR  2.29
    • A.  Determination of Whether Patient Has Capacity to Make Health Care Decision  2.30
    • B.  The Petition  2.31
    • C.  Form: Petition for Authority to Consent to Medical Treatment  2.32
    • D.  Notice  2.33
    • E.  Order When Patient Has Capacity  2.34
    • F.  Order When Patient Lacks Capacity  2.35
    • G.  Form: Order Authorizing Medical Treatment  2.36
  • IV.  PAYMENT OR DELIVERY OF MONEY OR PROPERTY FOR BENEFIT OF PERSON WITH DISABILITY  2.37
    • A.  Definition of Person With a Disability  2.38
    • B.  Petition  2.38A
    • C.  Expedited Petition  2.38B
    • D.  Disposition of Funds
      • 1.  When There Is No Conservatorship of the Estate  2.39
      • 2.  When Conservatorship of Estate Exists  2.40
  • V.  REMOVAL OF NONRESIDENT’S PROPERTY  2.41
    • A.  Form: Petition for Authority to Remove Nonresident’s Property to Place of Residence  2.42
    • B.  Form: Order Authorizing Removal of Nonresident’s Property to Place of Residence  2.43
  • VI.  SETTING ASIDE PERSONAL PROPERTY TO FAMILY OF ABSENTEE
    • A.  Definition of Absentee  2.44
    • B.  Value of Interest in Personal Property May Not Exceed $20,000  2.45
    • C.  Who May Petition  2.46
    • D.  Notice  2.47
    • E.  Required Court Findings; Postorder Accounting  2.48
    • F.  Form: Petition for Order Setting Aside Absentee’s Personal Property to Absentee’s Family  2.49
    • G.  Form: Order Setting Aside Absentee’s Personal Property to Absentee’s Family  2.50

3

Jurisdiction, Venue, Transfer of Personal Property to Foreign Jurisdiction

Don Edward Green

  • I.  JURISDICTION
    • A.  Jurisdiction of Probate Court
      • 1.  Basis of Jurisdiction  3.1
      • 2.  Scope of Jurisdiction  3.2
      • 3.  Jurisdictional Limits: Medical Treatments  3.3
      • 4.  Notice Requirements  3.4
      • 5.  Branch Courts Within County  3.5
    • B.  Jurisdictional Aspects of Notice
      • 1.  Statutory Requirements  3.6
      • 2.  Due Process Requirements  3.7
      • 3.  Obtaining Jurisdiction  3.8
      • 4.  Service Not Always Jurisdictional Prerequisite  3.9
    • C.  California Conservatorship Jurisdiction Act  3.9A
    • D.  California Conservatorship Jurisdiction Act: Application  3.9B
    • E.  Communications With Other Courts and Obtaining of Evidence or Information  3.9C
    • F.  Jurisdiction  3.9D
    • G.  When Another State is a More Appropriate Forum  3.9E
    • H.  Unjustifiable Conduct  3.9F
    • I.  Petition for Appointment  3.9G
    • J.  Transfer of Conservatorship  3.9H
    • K.  Petition to Confirm Transfer to California  3.9I
    • L.  Registration and Recognition of Orders From Other States  3.9J
    • M.  Letters  3.9K
    • N.  Appointment of Counsel  3.9L
    • O.  Appeals  3.9M
    • P.  Absentees  3.9N
    • Q.  Investigator’s Role  3.9O
    • R.  Court Review After Transfer  3.9P
  • II.  VENUE  3.10
    • A.  Resident Conservatee  3.11
    • B.  Nonresident Conservatee  3.12
    • C.  Proceedings in Multiple Counties  3.13
    • D.  Change of Venue
      • 1.  Petitioning for Transfer of Proceedings  3.14
        • a.  Contents of Petition  3.15
        • b.  Notice  3.16
        • c.  Form: Petition to Transfer Proceedings to Another County (Prob C §2211)  3.17
      • 2.  Objecting to or Supporting Transfer
        • a.  Making Objections or Supporting Petition  3.18
        • b.  Form: Objections to or Declarations in Support of Petition to Transfer Proceedings (Prob C §2215(a))  3.19
      • 3.  Form: Order Granting or Denying Transfer of Proceedings to Another County (Prob C §2215(b))  3.20
      • 4.  Transfer of Records by Court Clerk  3.21
      • 5.  Court Actions Following Transfer  3.21A
  • III.  TRANSFER OF PERSONAL PROPERTY TO ANOTHER STATE OR COUNTRY
    • A.  When Petition to Transfer Personal Property to Foreign Jurisdiction May Be Used  3.22
    • B.  Who May Petition  3.23
    • C.  Contents of Petition  3.24
      • 1.  Information About Foreign Conservator  3.25
      • 2.  Assets to Be Transferred  3.26
      • 3.  Pending Actions Against Conservator, Conservatee, or Estate  3.27
    • D.  Form: Petition for Transfer of Personal Property to Another Jurisdiction (Prob C §2803)  3.28
    • E.  Verification
      • 1.  Requirements  3.29
      • 2.  Form: Verification by Declaration  3.30
    • F.  Notice and Service of Petition  3.31
    • G.  Objections to Petition  3.32
    • H.  Required Findings  3.33
    • I.  Form: Order for Transfer of Personal Property to Another Jurisdiction (Prob C §2806)  3.34
    • J.  Transfer to Another State or Country  3.35
    • K.  Terminating California Proceedings  3.36
  • IV.  California Conservatorship Jurisdiction Act Forms
    • A.  Form: Conservatorship Registration Cover Sheet and Attestation of Conservatee’s Non-Residence in California (Judicial Council Form GC-360)  3.37
    • B.  Form: Notice of Intent to Register Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-361)  3.38
    • C.  Form: Conservatorship Registrant’s Acknowledgement of Receipt of Handbook For Conservators (Judicial Council Form GC-362)  3.39

4

Notice

E. Joan Nelms

Patina A. Madison

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  4.1
  • II.  TIME FOR GIVING NOTICE  4.2
  • III.  SERVICE
    • A.  Manner of Service
      • 1.  Available Methods  4.3
      • 2.  Methods Authorized by Court  4.4
      • 3.  Personal Delivery: CCP §415.10  4.5
      • 4.  Service by Mail and Acknowledgment of Receipt: CCP §415.30
        • a.  Statutory Requirements  4.6
        • b.  Practical Problems in Use of Acknowledgment and Receipt  4.7
      • 5.  Substituted Service (CCP §415.20)  4.8
      • 6.  Service by Publication (CCP §415.50)  4.9
      • 7.  Form: Application for Order Authorizing Service by Publication: CCP §415.50  4.10
      • 8.  Service Outside California: CCP §415.40  4.11
    • B.  When Notice Is Deemed Complete  4.12
    • C.  Waiver of Notice
      • 1.  When and How to Obtain  4.13
      • 2.  Form: Waiver of Notice  4.14
    • D.  Proof of Service
      • 1.  Methods of Proof  4.15
      • 2.  Form: Proof of Service of Summons (Judicial Council Form POS-010)  4.16
      • 3.  Form: Notice and Acknowledgment of Receipt—Civil (Judicial Council Form POS-015)  4.17
      • 4.  Form: Declaration (or Affidavit) of Service by Return Receipt Mail to Person Outside California: CCP §415.40  4.18
  • IV.  NOTICE BY MAIL
    • A.  When Notice by Mail Is Required  4.19
    • B.  Persons Entitled to Receive Notice by Mail  4.20
      • 1.  Notice to Surety  4.21
      • 2.  Notice to Minor  4.22
    • C.  Proceedings in Which Prob C §1460 Mailing Is Required  4.23
    • D.  Mailing Requirements  4.24
    • E.  Proof of Mailing  4.25
    • F.  Form: Declaration (or Affidavit) of Service by Mail: Prob C §1261; CCP §1013a  4.26
    • G.  What Must Be Sent  4.27
    • H.  Judicial Council Form Must Be Used  4.28
    • I.  Failure to Give Notice by Mail  4.29
  • V.  NOTICE BY FAX TRANSMISSION  4.29A
  • VI.  NOTICE BY ELECTRONIC MEANS  4.29B
  • VII.  POSTING AND PUBLICATION  4.30
  • VIII.  COURT’S LATITUDE IN NOTICE REQUIREMENTS  4.31
    • A.  Authority to Shorten or Lengthen Time or to Expand or Modify Number of Required Recipients  4.32
    • B.  Authority to Prescribe Notice  4.33
      • 1.  Form: Application for Order Prescribing Notice  4.34
      • 2.  Form: Order Prescribing Notice (Probate) (Judicial Council Form DE-200, GC-022)  4.35
      • 3.  Form: Order Shortening Time  4.36
    • C.  Authority to Dispense With Notice  4.37
    • D.  Form: Order Dispensing With Notice—Guardianship or Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-021)  4.38
  • IX.  REQUEST FOR SPECIAL NOTICE
    • A.  Who May Request Special Notice  4.39
    • B.  Procedure  4.40
    • C.  Effectiveness of Request  4.41
    • D.  Failure to Give Special Notice Requires Continuance or Resetting  4.42
    • E.  Preparation of Judicial Council Form  4.43
    • F.  Form: Request for Special Notice (Probate) (Judicial Council Form DE-154, GC-035)  4.44
    • G.  Form: Waiver of Special Notice  4.45
    • H.  Recitals on Ex Parte Applications  4.46
  • X.  NOTICE TO INTERESTED PUBLIC ENTITIES
    • A.  State Hospitals  4.47
    • B.  Department of Veterans Affairs  4.48
    • C.  Director of Regional Center for Developmentally Disabled  4.49
    • D.  Public Guardian  4.49A
  • XI.  NOTICE IN CERTAIN PROCEEDINGS REGARDING MISSING PERSONS  4.50

5

Starting Conservatorship Proceedings

Margaret M. Hand

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  5.1
  • II.  JUDICIAL COUNCIL FORMS
    • A.  Use of Official Forms Required  5.2
    • B.  Use of Attachments  5.3
    • C.  Local Forms  5.3A
  • III.  GATHERING INFORMATION
    • A.  In General  5.4
    • B.  Domestic Partnership  5.5
    • C.  Capacity Declaration  5.6
    • D.  Client Questionnaire  5.7
    • E.  Initial Client Interview  5.8
      • 1.  Use of an Interview Checklist  5.9
      • 2.  Form: Interview Checklist  5.10
    • F.  Information for Proposed Conservator  5.11
  • IV.  PREPARATION OF INDIVIDUAL FORMS
    • A.  Confidential Supplemental Information Statement  5.12
    • B.  Form: Confidential Supplemental Information (Judicial Council Form GC-312)  5.13
    • C.  Confidential Conservator Screening Form  5.14
    • D.  Form: Confidential Conservator Screening Form (Judicial Council Form GC-314)  5.15
    • E.  Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310)
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310)  5.16
      • 2.  Introduction (Prayer)  5.17
      • 3.  Heading and Caption  5.18
      • 4.  Prayer: Item 1
        • a.  Petitioner’s and Proposed Conservator’s Names (Items 1a–1b)  5.19
        • b.  Bond (Item 1c)  5.20
        • c.  Independent Powers (Item 1d)  5.21
        • d.  Form: Request for Independent Powers  5.21A
        • e.  Capacity of Proposed Conservatee (Item 1e)  5.22
        • f.  Powers and Duties of Conservator of the Person (Item 1f)  5.23
        • g.  Informed Consent to Medical Treatment or Healing by Prayer (Item 1g)  5.24
        • h.  Dementia Placement or Treatment Powers (Item 1k)  5.25
        • i.  Other Orders: General (Item 1l)  5.26
        • j.  Other Orders: If Spouse or Domestic Partner Is Petitioner or Proposed Conservatee (Item 1l)  5.27
      • 5.  Name, Address, and Telephone Number of Proposed Conservatee (Item 2)  5.28
      • 6.  Jurisdictional Facts (Item 3a)  5.29
      • 7.  Information About Petitioner
        • a.  Information About Petitioner (Items 3b, 3c)  5.30
        • b.  Additional Information Required if Petitioner Is Not Conservatee  5.30A
        • c.  Additional Information Required if Petitioner Is Professional Fiduciary  5.30B
        • d.  Form: Professional Fiduciary Attachment to Petition for Appointment of Guardian or Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-210(A-PF)/GC-310(A-PF))  5.30C
      • 8.  Information About Proposed Conservator (Item 3c)  5.31
      • 9.  Character and Value of Estate Property (Item 3e)
        • a.  In General  5.32
        • b.  Retirement Plans: A Special Problem  5.33
      • 10.  Information About Government Benefits (Items 4a–4c)  5.34
      • 11.  Status of Proposed Conservatee (Item 5a)  5.35
      • 12.  Grounds for Appointment (Item 5c)
        • a.  Showing Required  5.36
        • b.  Evidence of Inability to Provide for Personal Needs or Manage Personal Finances  5.37
      • 13.  Good Cause for Appointment on Voluntary Request (Item 5d)  5.38
      • 14.  Confidential Supplemental Information Statement (Item 5e)  5.39
      • 15.  Developmental Disability (Item 5f)  5.40
      • 16.  Spouse as Petitioner or Proposed Conservator (Item 6)  5.41
      • 17.  Domestic Partner as Petitioner or Proposed Conservator (Item 7)  5.42
      • 18.  Attendance of Proposed Conservatee at Hearing (Item 8)  5.43
      • 19.  Independent Powers [Deleted]  5.44
      • 20.  Capacity to Give Informed Medical Consent (Item 9)  5.45
      • 21.  Temporary Conservatorship (Item 10)  5.46
      • 22.  Relatives Entitled to Notice (Item 11)  5.47
      • 23.  Confidential Conservator Screening Form (Item 12)  5.47A
      • 24.  Administrative Provisions (Items 13–14)  5.48
      • 25.  Signatures and Verification  5.49
    • F.  Consent to Act as Conservator
      • 1.  Evidence of Consent  5.50
      • 2.  Form: Consent to Act as Conservator  5.51
    • G.  Capacity Declaration
      • 1.  Introduction  5.52
      • 2.  Form: Capacity Declaration—Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-335)  5.53
      • 3.  Impact of Medical Privacy Law  5.54
        • a.  Disclosure Pursuant to Proposed Conservatee’s Authorization to Release Medical Information  5.55
        • b.  Disclosure Pursuant to Court Order  5.56
          • (1)  Ex Parte Application for Order Authorizing Completion of Capacity Declaration—HIPAA (Judicial Council Form GC-333)  5.57
          • (2)  Ex Parte Order Re Completion of Capacity Declaration—HIPAA (Judicial Council Form GC-334)  5.58
        • c.  Other Exceptions to Nondisclosure Rules  5.59
      • 4.  Form: Dementia Attachment to Capacity Declaration—Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-335A)  5.60
    • H.  Form: Request to Waive Court Fees (Judicial Council Form FW-001-GC)  5.60A
    • I.  Form: Request to Waive Additional Court Fees (Superior Court) (Judicial Council Form FW-002-GC)  5.60B
    • J.  Form: Order on Court Fee Waiver (Superior Court) (Judicial Council Form FW-003-GC)  5.60C
    • K.  Other Forms to Bring When Filing the Petition  5.60D
  • V.  PROCEDURE AFTER PETITION IS FILED
    • A.  Citation and Notice of Hearing  5.61
      • 1.  Service of Citation for Conservatorship on Proposed Conservatee and Proof of Service  5.62
      • 2.  Comatose Proposed Conservatee  5.63
      • 3.  Waiver of Service  5.64
      • 4.  If Service Is Not Possible  5.65
    • B.  Form: Citation for Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-320)  5.66
    • C.  Notice Requirements  5.67
      • 1.  State and County Agencies  5.68
      • 2.  Federal Agencies  5.69
    • D.  Notice of Hearing
      • 1.  Form: Notice of Hearing—Guardianship or Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-020)  5.70
      • 2.  Preparation and Mailing of Notice of Hearing Form  5.71
      • 3.  Waiver of Notice  5.72
    • E.  No Ex Parte Communications  5.72A
  • VI.  COURT INVESTIGATOR
    • A.  Appointment  5.73
    • B.  Visit  5.74
    • C.  Report
      • 1.  Content and Confidentiality  5.74A
      • 2.  Notice of Report  5.74B
  • VII.  PROPOSED CONSERVATEE’S RIGHT TO LEGAL COUNSEL
    • A.  When Counsel Must Be Appointed  5.75
    • B.  Selection and Role of Appointed Legal Counsel  5.76
  • VIII.  THE HEARING
    • A.  Who Must Attend  5.77
      • 1.  Exceptions to Required Attendance by Proposed Conservatee  5.78
        • a.  Out-of-State Proposed Conservatee  5.79
        • b.  Refusal of Proposed Conservatee to Attend  5.80
        • c.  Medical Inability of Proposed Conservatee to Attend  5.81
      • 2.  Proposed Conservatee’s Failure to Attend  5.82
    • B.  Information Given Proposed Conservatee by Court  5.83
    • C.  Petitioner’s Proof at Hearing  5.84
    • D.  Uncontested Hearing  5.85
    • E.  Contested Hearing  5.86
      • 1.  Requirements for Form of Objections  5.87
      • 2.  Form: Objections to Petition for Appointment of Conservator  5.88
      • 3.  Setting Contested Hearing for Trial  5.89
  • IX.  APPOINTMENT OF CONSERVATOR
    • A.  Form: Order Appointing Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340)   5.90
      • 1.  Caption, Information, and Warning Concerning Hearing  5.91
      • 2.  Findings (Items 1–16) and Orders (Items 17–33)  5.92
      • 3.  Service of Order; Notice of Conservatee’s Rights  5.92A
      • 4.  Form: Notice of Conservatee’s Rights (Judicial Council Forms GC-341, GC-341(MA))  5.92B
    • B.  Order Denying Petition to Appoint Conservator
      • 1.  Preparation of the Order  5.93
      • 2.  Form: Order Denying Petition to Appoint Conservator  5.94
    • C.  Letters of Conservatorship  5.95
      • 1.  Prerequisites to Issuance of Letters  5.96
      • 2.  Form: Duties of Conservator and Acknowledgment of Receipt of Handbook for Conservators (Judicial Council Form GC-348)  5.97
      • 3.  Preparation of Letters of Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-350)  5.98
      • 4.  Form: Letters of Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-350)  5.99
      • 5.  Form: Affirmation Clause  5.100
      • 6.  Recording Letters of Conservatorship  5.101
      • 7.  Change of Name of Conservator  5.102
    • D.  Determination of Conservatee’s Appropriate Level of Care  5.102A
  • X.  ADVISING CONSERVATOR OF DUTIES
    • A.  Information Provided by Each County  5.103
    • B.  Role of Attorney for the Conservator  5.104
    • C.  Form: Sample Letter to Conservator of the Estate  5.105
  • XI.  FEES AND EXPENSES  5.106
  • XII.  CONSERVATORSHIPS FOR ABSENTEES AND MISSING PERSONS
    • A.  Introduction  5.107
    • B.  Modifying the Petition (Judicial Council Form GC-310)  5.108
    • C.  Missing Person Allegations (Attachment 5c(2))  5.109
    • D.  Form: Sample Attachment (Item 5c(2))  5.110
    • E.  Procedure After Filing the Petition
      • 1.  Establishing Absentee Status  5.111
      • 2.  Notice of Hearing  5.112
      • 3.  Required Findings for Appointment of Conservator for Missing Person; Order  5.113

6

Temporary Conservatorships

Susanne B. Cohen

  • I.  INTRODUCTION
    • A.  When Temporary Conservatorship Is Appropriate  6.1
    • B.  Proposed Conservatees With Significant Out of State Contacts: CCJA Implementation  6.1A
    • C.  Grounds for Appointment  6.2
    • D.  Good Cause in Elder Abuse or Dependent Adult Cases  6.2A
    • E.  Ex Parte Communications With Court  6.2B
    • F.  Duration of Temporary Conservatorship  6.3
  • II.  PETITION AND APPOINTMENT
    • A.  Required Forms  6.4
    • B.  Optional Forms  6.4A
    • C.  When Petition May Be Filed  6.5
    • D.  Petitioner
      • 1.  Who May Petition  6.6
      • 2.  Professional Fiduciaries  6.6A
      • 3.  Public Guardian  6.7
    • E.  Determination of Whether Proposed Conservator Can Qualify for Bond  6.8
    • F.  Ex Parte Appointments
      • 1.  When Petition May Be Granted Ex Parte  6.9
      • 2.  Pleading Requirements for Good Cause Exception to Notice of Hearing on Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator  6.9A
      • 3.  Form: Ex Parte Application for Good Cause Exception to Notice of Hearing on Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-112)  6.9B
      • 4.  Form: Declaration in Support of Ex Parte Application for Good Cause Exception to Notice of Hearing on Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-112(A-1))  6.9C
      • 5.  Form: Order on Ex Parte Application for Good Cause Exception to Notice of Hearing on Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-115)  6.9D
      • 6.  Notice and Hearing Requirements if Petition to Terminate Filed After Ex Parte Appointment  6.9E
    • G.  Hearing When Specific Powers Are Requested in Petition for Appointment  6.10
    • H.  Additional Requirements if Petition Includes Request to Change Conservatee’s Residence  6.11
    • I.  Additional Pleadings
      • 1.  Confidential Conservator Screening Form and Handbook of Duties  6.12
      • 2.  Capacity Declaration
        • a.  When Required  6.13
        • b.  HIPAA and CMIA Concerns  6.14
        • c.  Disclosure of Medical Information to Probate Court Investigator or Public Guardian  6.14A
    • J.  Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator
      • 1.  Preparation of Petition  6.15
      • 2.  Practice Tips From Court Investigators  6.15A
      • 3.  Form: Petition for Appointment of Temporary Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-111)  6.16
    • K.  Notice  6.16A
    • L.  Hearing
      • 1.  Proposed Conservatee Required to Attend  6.16B
      • 2.  Court Investigator’s Duty to Investigate  6.16C
    • M.  Order Appointing Temporary Conservator
      • 1.  Preparation of Order  6.17
      • 2.  Form: Order Appointing Temporary Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-141)  6.18
    • N.  Bond  6.19
    • O.  Letters of Temporary Conservatorship
      • 1.  Preparation of Letters  6.20
      • 2.  Form: Letters of Temporary Guardianship or Conservatorship (Judicial Council Form GC-150)  6.21
    • P.  Appealing or Vacating the Order  6.22
  • III.  POWERS AND DUTIES OF TEMPORARY CONSERVATOR  6.23
    • A.  Temporary Conservator of the Person
      • 1.  Medical Treatment  6.24
      • 2.  Change of Conservatee’s Residence: Emergencies  6.25
      • 3.  Change of Conservatee’s Residence: Nonemergencies
        • a.  Power Is Severely Limited  6.26
        • b.  Removing Conservatee From California Prohibited Without Court Authorization  6.27
        • c.  Attendance at Hearing Required  6.28
        • d.  Conservatee’s Right to Counsel  6.29
        • e.  Court Investigator  6.30
    • B.  Temporary Conservator of the Estate  6.31
      • 1.  Avoiding Conflicts of Interest: Cal Rules of Ct 7.1059(a)  6.31A
      • 2.  Estate Management Duties: Cal Rules of Ct 7.1059(b)  6.31B
      • 3.  First Steps: Advice for the Conservator  6.32
        • a.  Taking Possession and Control of Financial and Other Institution Accounts  6.33
        • b.  Account Statements  6.34
        • c.  Beneficiary Designations on Conservatee’s Accounts  6.34A
        • d.  Institution’s Responsibility for Filing Judicial Council Form  6.34B
      • 4.  Temporary Conservatee’s Capacity to Contract  6.35
      • 5.  Interaction of Temporary Conservatorship With Trusts  6.36
    • C.  Inventory and Appraisal  6.37
    • D.  Selling or Relinquishing Conservatee’s Property  6.38
  • IV.  TERMINATION OF TEMPORARY CONSERVATORSHIP
    • A.  In General  6.39
    • B.  Distribution of Temporary Conservatorship Estate  6.40
    • C.  Accounting on Termination
      • 1.  Requirements  6.41
      • 2.  Content and Preparation of Account and Report  6.42
      • 3.  Form: Final Account and Report of Temporary Conservator  6.43
      • 4.  Form: Order Settling Account  6.44
    • D.  Notice of Account  6.45
  • V.  REMOVAL OF TEMPORARY CONSERVATOR  6.46

7

Court-Appointed Counsel: An Overview

Samuel D. Ingham III

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  7.1
  • II.  STATUTORY GROUNDS FOR APPOINTMENT
    • A.  Discretionary and Mandatory Appointment
      • 1.  Discretionary  7.2
      • 2.  Mandatory if Requested by Subject Person  7.3
      • 3.  Mandatory Even if Unrequested by Subject Person  7.4
      • 4.  Mandatory Appointment for Other Specific Proceedings  7.5
      • 5.  Procedure for Appointment of Counsel  7.5A
        • a.  Form: Application for Appointment of Counsel (Judicial Council Form GC-005)  7.5B
        • b.  Form: Order Appointing Legal Counsel (Judicial Council Form GC-006)  7.5C
    • B.  Other Roles Distinguished  7.6
      • 1.  Probate Guardian Ad Litem  7.7
      • 2.  Expert, Referee, and Mediator  7.8
  • III.  STATE AND LOCAL RULES ESTABLISH QUALIFICATIONS AND CONTINUING EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS  7.9
    • A.  Exceptions to Rules of Court Requirements for Small Courts  7.9A
    • B.  Qualifications of Counsel in Private Practice  7.9B
    • C.  Qualifications of Public Defenders  7.9C
    • D.  Continuing Education and Certification Requirements  7.9D
  • IV.  FACTORS TO CONSIDER BEFORE ACCEPTANCE  7.10
  • V.  PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Introduction  7.11
    • B.  Documentation
      • 1.  Pleadings and Confidential Court Papers in New or Existing Proceedings  7.12
      • 2.  Documents in Related Proceedings  7.13
      • 3.  Other Documentation  7.14
    • C.  Interviews  7.15
      • 1.  Client  7.16
      • 2.  Petitioner and Proposed Conservator  7.17
      • 3.  Family  7.18
      • 4.  Care Providers  7.19
      • 5.  Others  7.20
    • D.  Written Report
      • 1.  Purpose  7.21
      • 2.  Contents  7.22
      • 3.  Disclosure  7.23
    • E.  Appearance at Hearing  7.24
    • F.  After the Hearing  7.24A
  • VI.  ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Effect of Client Impairment  7.25
      • 1.  Total Impairment or No Impairment  7.26
      • 2.  Partial Impairment  7.27
      • 3.  Conclusion  7.28
    • B.  Confidentiality  7.29
    • C.  Relationship of Court-Appointed Counsel With Private Counsel  7.30
      • 1.  If Subject Person Is Clearly Incapacitated  7.30A
      • 2.  If Subject Person’s Capacity Is Questionable  7.30B
    • D.  Later Retention of Court-Appointed Counsel as Private Counsel  7.31
    • E.  Appointment Personal to Appointee  7.32
    • F.  Duty Owed Only to Conservatee  7.32A
  • VII.  DISCHARGE OR ONGOING REPRESENTATION  7.33

8

Court Investigations and Reports

Leonard Thomas Adamiak

Dee Dee Blackwood

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  8.1
  • II.  OFFICE OF COURT INVESTIGATOR
    • A.  Legislature Suspends Requirements of the Omnibus Conservatorship and Guardianship Reform Act of 2006  8.1A
    • B.  Qualifications and Functions  8.2
    • C.  Chart: Directory of California Court Investigators’ Offices  8.3
  • III.  WHEN INVESTIGATIONS MAY BE REQUIRED  8.4
    • A.  Initial Investigations for Temporary Conservatorships  8.4A
    • B.  Before Appointment of Conservator  8.5
      • 1.  Appointment of Investigator
        • a.  When the Appointment Is Made  8.6
        • b.  Papers to Be Routed to Court Investigator’s Office  8.7
        • c.  Form: Order Appointing Court Investigator (Judicial Council Form GC-330)  8.8
      • 2.  Investigation
        • a.  Cooperation of Petitioner With Court Investigator  8.9
        • b.  Disclosure of Medical Information to Court Investigator
          • (1)  Authorized Disclosure  8.9A
          • (2)  Form: Ex Parte Order Authorizing Disclosure of (Proposed) Conservatee’s Health Information to Court Investigator—HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) (Judicial Council Form GC-336)  8.9B
        • c.  Interview With Proposed Conservatee
          • (1)  Information Given to Proposed Conservatee  8.10
          • (2)  Who May Be Present at the Interview  8.11
          • (3)  Previous Investigation Related to Temporary Conservatorship  8.11A
          • (4)  Investigator’s Evaluation and Determinations  8.12
          • (5)  Role of Proposed Conservator and Proposed Conservator’s Counsel  8.13
        • d.  Other Persons Who Must Be Interviewed  8.13A
      • 3.  Court Investigator’s Report to Court
        • a.  Written Report Required  8.14
        • b.  Confidentiality; Who May Receive Copies  8.15
    • C.  Investigation in Connection With Petition for Authority to Give Consent for Medical Treatment
      • 1.  Appointment of Investigator  8.16
      • 2.  Investigation and Report  8.17
    • D.  Investigation on Review of Conservatorship
      • 1.  Periodic Review and Investigation Required  8.18
      • 2.  Notice of Investigation and Review  8.19
      • 3.  Form: Order Appointing Court Investigator (Review and Successor Conservator Investigations) (Judicial Council Form GC-331)  8.20
      • 4.  Investigation and Findings
        • a.  Investigator’s Determinations
          • (1)  In Every Case  8.21
          • (2)  If Conservator Has Prob C §2356.5 Powers  8.22
        • b.  Report  8.23
        • c.  Testimony by Court Investigator at Trial and Admissibility of Investigator’s Report  8.23A
      • 5.  Actions Following Review  8.24
      • 6.  If Conservatee Cannot Be Located  8.25
    • E.  Investigation in Connection With Change of Temporary Conservatee’s Residence
      • 1.  Need for Court Investigation  8.26
      • 2.  Appointment of Investigator  8.27
      • 3.  Interview and Report  8.28
    • F.  Investigation Before Appointment of Successor Conservator  8.29
    • G.  Investigations in Limited Conservatorships  8.30
  • IV.  COST OF COURT INVESTIGATOR’S SERVICES  8.31

9

Bonds

Samuel D. Ingham III

William Mingram

  • I.  WHEN BOND IS REQUIRED
    • A.  General Rules  9.1
    • B.  Waivers and Exceptions  9.2
    • C.  Procedure for Filing Bonds  9.2A
  • II.  JOINT BONDS  9.3
  • III.  AMOUNT OF BOND
    • A.  Basic Rules  9.4
    • B.  Amount for Cost of Recovery on Bond  9.4A
  • IV.  SUBSTITUTES FOR BOND ISSUED BY ADMITTED SURETY INSURER
    • A.  Individual Sureties  9.5
    • B.  Deposit in Lieu of Surety  9.6
  • V.  CONTROL BY SURETY  9.7
  • VI.  DECREASING AMOUNT OF BOND BY DEPOSIT IN BLOCKED ACCOUNT  9.8
    • A.  Practical Considerations  9.9
    • B.  When Deposit Is Made
      • 1.  At Outset of Conservatorship  9.10
      • 2.  After Appointment  9.10A
    • C.  Form: Receipt of Personal Property and Agreement  9.11
    • D.  Allegations to Authorize Blocked Accounts in Petition for Appointment of Conservator  9.12
      • 1.  Form: Allegation Concerning Deposit in Blocked Account  9.13
      • 2.  Form: Allegation Concerning Disbursements of Money From Deposited Property  9.14
    • E.  Orders Approving Blocked Accounts  9.15
      • 1.  Form: Attachment to Order Appointing Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) When Bond Reduced by Previously Deposited Assets  9.16
      • 2.  Form: Attachment to Order When Assets Yet to Be Deposited  9.17
      • 3.  Form: Order Permitting Withdrawals  9.18
  • VII.  DECREASING AMOUNT OF BOND AFTER APPOINTMENT AND QUALIFICATION  9.19
    • A.  Petition  9.19A
    • B.  Form: Petition for Reduction of Bond  9.20
    • C.  The Order  9.21
    • D.  Form: Order Reducing Bond  9.22
  • VIII.  INCREASING AMOUNT OF BOND  9.23
    • A.  Events Making Increase Necessary or Appropriate  9.24
    • B.  Procedure  9.25
    • C.  Form: Ex Parte Application to Increase Bond  9.26
    • D.  Form: Ex Parte Order Increasing Bond  9.27
    • E.  Sanctions  9.28
  • IX.  SURETIES
    • A.  Release and Substitution  9.29
    • B.  Liability
      • 1.  When Surety’s Liability Accrues  9.30
      • 2.  Surety’s Defenses  9.30A
      • 3.  Required Notice to Surety  9.30B
  • X.  WHO MAY SUE; PERIOD OF LIMITATIONS  9.31

10

First Steps of Administration, Marshaling Assets, and Inventory and Appraisal

Kathryn M. Murphy

  • I.  INTRODUCTION
    • A.  Conservator’s Initial Acts  10.1
    • B.  Temporary Conservator  10.2
  • II.  TAKING CONTROL
    • A.  By Conservator of the Person and Conservator of the Estate
      • 1.  Residence
        • a.  Establishing Residence  10.3
        • b.  Protecting Residence  10.4
        • c.  Protecting Personal Property at Residence  10.5
        • d.  Mail  10.6
      • 2.  Automobiles  10.7
      • 3.  Conservatee’s Use of Personal Property  10.8
    • B.  By Conservator of Estate
      • 1.  Assets Included in Estate; Out-of-State Real Property  10.8A
      • 2.  Ascertaining and Protecting Assets
        • a.  Ascertaining Assets  10.9
        • b.  Title to Assets  10.10
        • c.  Notification to Court Required When Taking Possession or Control of Assets in Institutions
          • (1)  When Notification Is Required  10.10A
          • (2)  Form: Notice of Opening or Changing a Guardianship or Conservatorship Account or Safe-Deposit Box (Judicial Council Form GC-051)  10.10B
          • (3)  Form: Notice of Taking Possession or Control of an Asset of Minor or Conservatee (Judicial Council Form GC-050)  10.10C
        • d.  Bank and Other Financial Accounts
          • (1)  Locating Information  10.11
          • (2)  Transferring Title  10.11A
          • (3)  Collecting Original Bank Statements  10.11B
        • e.  Joint Tenancy
          • (1)  Difficulties of Joint Tenancy Property  10.12
          • (2)  Title to Joint Tenancy Property  10.13
        • f.  Safe-Deposit Boxes  10.14
        • g.  Securities  10.15
        • h.  Tangible Personal Property  10.16
        • i.  Ongoing Business  10.17
        • j.  Miscellaneous Benefits and Insurance Policies  10.18
      • 3.  Examination of Persons About Estate Property
        • a.  Examination Under Prob C §2616  10.19
          • (1)  Petition for Examination  10.20
          • (2)  Costs  10.21
          • (3)  Cited Person’s Failure to Appear Is Ground for Contempt  10.22
          • (4)  Form: Petition for Examination of Person About Estate Property  10.23
          • (5)  Form: Citation—Probate (Probate—Decedents’ Estates and Guardianships and Conservatorships) (Judicial Council Form DE-122/GC-322)  10.24
        • b.  Accounting Under Prob C §2619  10.25
      • 4.  Taking Action to Recover Assets
        • a.  Necessity of Petitioning for Authority or Requesting Additional Powers; Attorney Fees  10.26
        • b.  Preparing Petition for Authority to Institute Prob C §850 Petition; Giving Notice  10.27
        • c.  Form: Petition for Authority to Institute Litigation Under Prob C §850, Retain Counsel, Enter Into Fee Agreement, and Pay Attorney  10.28
        • d.  Hearing on Petition; Order  10.29
        • e.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Institute Litigation Under Prob C §850, Retain Counsel, Enter Into Fee Agreement, and Pay Attorney  10.30
  • III.  TAKING INVENTORY
    • A.  Purposes of Inventory and Appraisal  10.31
    • B.  Differences Between Inventory and Appraisals in Conservatorships and Probate Estates  10.31A
    • C.  Who Appraises Assets
      • 1.  Conservator  10.32
      • 2.  Court-Appointed Probate Referee
        • a.  Appointment  10.33
        • b.  Waiver of Probate Referee  10.34
        • c.  Preparations for Submitting Inventory and Appraisal Form to Probate Referee  10.35
        • d.  Sale of Personal or Real Property  10.36
      • 3.  Expert Appraisers
        • a.  Purpose of Expert Appraiser  10.37
        • b.  Specific Uses of Expert Appraiser  10.38
      • 4.  Public Guardian  10.39
    • D.  Use of Attachments to Inventory and Appraisal  10.40
    • E.  Date of Valuation  10.41
    • F.  Bond Requirement  10.42
    • G.  Forms
      • 1.  Form: Inventory and Appraisal (Judicial Council Form DE-160/GC-040)  10.43
      • 2.  Form: Inventory and Appraisal Attachment (Judicial Council Form DE-161, GC-041)  10.44
      • 3.  Form: Sample Listing of Assets for Attachments to Inventory and Appraisal  10.45
    • H.  Description of Assets
      • 1.  Listing Assets  10.46
      • 2.  Cash and Cash Equivalents  10.47
      • 3.  Other Cash Items  10.48
      • 4.  Bank and Other Cash Accounts  10.49
      • 5.  Assets With CUSIP Numbers  10.50
        • a.  Bonds  10.51
        • b.  Stocks  10.52
      • 6.  Promissory Notes  10.53
      • 7.  Real Property  10.54
        • a.  Leases  10.55
        • b.  Water Company Stock Appurtenant to Land  10.56
      • 8.  Mineral Interests and Royalties
        • a.  Types of Rights and Valuations  10.57
        • b.  Mineral Interests  10.58
        • c.  Mineral Leases  10.59
        • d.  Royalty Interests  10.60
      • 9.  Business Interests  10.61
      • 10.  Life Insurance  10.62
      • 11.  Trust Assets
        • a.  Conservatee as Trustee  10.63
        • b.  Conservatee as Beneficiary  10.64
      • 12.  Jointly Owned Interests
        • a.  Joint Tenancy  10.65
        • b.  Tenancy in Common  10.66
        • c.  Community Property  10.67
      • 13.  Retirement Plans  10.68
      • 14.  Annuities  10.68A
      • 15.  Miscellaneous Items  10.69
    • I.  Property Excluded From Inventory
      • 1.  Wages of Conservatee  10.70
      • 2.  Out-of-State Real Property and Mineral Interests  10.71
      • 3.  Assets Not Reduced to Possession  10.72
      • 4.  Worthless Stocks [Deleted]  10.73
  • IV.  FILING INVENTORY AND APPRAISAL
    • A.  Time for Filing  10.74
    • B.  Filing and Notice
      • 1.  Requirements  10.75
      • 2.  Form: Notice of Filing Inventory and Appraisal and How to Object to the Inventory or the Appraised Value of Property (Judicial Council Form GC-042)  10.75A
      • 3.  Form: Attachment to Notice of Filing of Inventory and Appraisal and How to Object to the Inventory or the Appraised Value of Property (Judicial Council Form GC-042(MA))  10.75B
    • C.  Changes in Filed Inventory
      • 1.  Corrected Inventory  10.76
      • 2.  Supplemental Inventory  10.77
    • D.  Objections to Inventory and Appraisal
      • 1.  Procedures for Objecting  10.78
      • 2.  Form: Objections to Inventory and Appraisal of Conservator or Guardian (Judicial Council Form GC-045)  10.78A
    • E.  Court Oversight to Ensure Compliance  10.78B
    • F.  Effect of Failure to File  10.79

11

Issues of Legal Capacity of Conservatee

Peter S. Stern

  • I.  EFFECT OF INCAPACITY
    • A.  Concept of Incapacity  11.1
    • B.  Conservator’s Role and Conservatee’s Capacities  11.2
    • C.  Validity of Previously Executed Durable Power of Attorney for Financial Management  11.3
      • 1.  Form: Attachment 1l to Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310) (Power of Attorney)  11.4
      • 2.  Form: Attachment 29 to Order Appointing Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) (Power of Attorney)  11.5
  • II.  EXAMINATION TO EVALUATE CAPACITY
    • A.  Evaluation of Proposed Conservatee by Treating Physician  11.5A
    • B.  Obtaining Order for Physical or Mental Examination  11.5B
      • 1.  Condition Must Be in Controversy  11.5C
      • 2.  Good Faith Effort to Arrange Examination by Agreement  11.5D
      • 3.  Seeking an Order for Examination  11.5E
        • a.  Contents of Motion and Supporting Documents  11.5F
        • b.  Service of Motion  11.5G
        • c.  Order; Attending and Recording Examination  11.5H
    • C.  Obtaining Medical Records  11.5I
      • 1.  Deposition Subpoena  11.5J
      • 2.  Presentation of Proof of Service of Subpoena and Notice to Consumer to Document Custodian  11.5K
      • 3.  Opportunity to Object to Subpoena  11.5L
      • 4.  Admissibility of Medical Records  11.5M
  • III.  TRANSACTIONS FOR WHICH CONSERVATEE LACKS CAPACITY  11.6
    • A.  Conservatee Cannot Contract, Incur Debt, Sell, Transfer, Convey, or Encumber Property  11.7
    • B.  Real Property Exception—Recording Letters of Conservatorship  11.8
    • C.  Conservatee Cannot Make Gifts  11.9
    • D.  Conservatee Cannot Delegate Powers  11.10
    • E.  Previously Executed Nondurable Power of Attorney for Financial Management  11.11
    • F.  Conservatee Cannot Waive Rights  11.12
    • G.  Conservatee Cannot Serve as Fiduciary  11.13
    • H.  Conservatee Spouse or Domestic Partner Cannot Manage, Control, or Dispose of Community Property  11.14
    • I.  Conservatee’s Power to Exercise or Release Power of Appointment Not Clear  11.15
    • J.  Issue of Capacity to Retain Counsel
      • 1.  Before Appointment of Conservator  11.15A
      • 2.  After Appointment of Conservator of Estate  11.15B
  • IV.  CONSERVATEE’S CAPACITY CAN BE BROADENED  11.16
    • A.  Broadened Capacity of Conservatee Does Not Narrow Conservator’s Powers  11.17
    • B.  Limitations on Broadened Capacity  11.18
    • C.  Form: Petition for Order Broadening Capacity of Conservatee  11.19
    • D.  Form: Order Broadening Capacity of Conservatee  11.20
  • V.  TRANSACTIONS FOR WHICH CONSERVATEE HAS CAPACITY  11.21
    • A.  Capacity to Control Allowance, Wages, and Salary  11.22
    • B.  Capacity to Provide Necessaries of Life  11.23
    • C.  Capacity to Make a Will Not Eliminated by Conservatorship  11.24
    • D.  Capacity to Give Informed Consent for Medical Treatment  11.25
    • E.  Capacity to Exercise End of Life Option  11.25A
    • F.  Capacity to Marry or Enter Into Domestic Partnership
      • 1.  Conservatee Presumed to Have Capacity to Marry or to Enter Into Domestic Partnership  11.26
      • 2.  Judicial Determination Under Prob C §1901  11.27
      • 3.  Form: Petition for Order Determining Whether Conservatee Has Capacity to Marry or Enter Into Registered Domestic Partnership  11.28
      • 4.  Form: Order Determining Whether Conservatee Has Capacity to Marry or Enter Into Registered Domestic Partnership  11.29
    • G.  Capacity to Seek Annulment, Legal Separation, Divorce, or Termination of Registered Domestic Partnership
      • 1.  Person of “Unsound Mind” Eligible for Annulment  11.30
      • 2.  Legal Separation or Termination of Domestic Partnership  11.31
      • 3.  Conservatee’s Consent Should Be Obtained for Dissolution  11.32
      • 4.  Proper Representative; Proper Court  11.33
      • 5.  If Conservator Individually Files for Divorce or Terminates Domestic Partnership  11.33A
      • 6.  Dissolution of Marriage and Registered Domestic Partnership in Single Action  11.33B
    • H.  Capacity to Vote Requires Ability to Communicate Desire to Participate in Voting Process  11.34
    • I.  Capacity to Serve on Jury  11.35
    • J.  Capacity to Retain Personal Rights  11.35A
      • 1.  Form: Attachment 1l to Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310) (Personal Rights)  11.35B
      • 2.  Form: Attachment 29 to Order Appointing Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) (Personal Rights)  11.35C
  • VI.  CONSERVATEE’S LIABILITY FOR TORTS DEPENDS ON GENERAL CAPACITY  11.36

12

General Responsibilities of Conservators

Bettie Baker Marshall

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  12.1
  • II.  LIABILITY OF CONSERVATOR AS FIDUCIARY  12.2
  • III.  REGULATION OF EX PARTE COMMUNICATIONS  12.2A
    • A.  Disclosure  12.2B
    • B.  Further Court Action  12.2C
  • IV.  CONSERVATOR’S GENERAL PLAN  12.3
  • V.  MULTIPLE CONSERVATORS
    • A.  Decision-Making by Multiple Conservators  12.4
    • B.  Liability of Co-Conservators  12.5
    • C.  When One Conservator May Act for Others
      • 1.  Permitted When Joint Conservator Cannot Serve  12.6
      • 2.  Petition for Authority of Joint Conservator to Act Under Prob C §2105(e)  12.7
        • a.  Form: Petition for Authority of Joint Conservator to Act  12.8
        • b.  Form: Order Authorizing Joint Conservator to Act  12.9
  • VI.  CONSERVATOR FOR MORE THAN ONE CONSERVATEE  12.10
  • VII.  CONSERVATOR FOR NONRESIDENT  12.11
  • VIII.  PROFESSIONAL CONSERVATORS
    • A.  License Required  12.12
    • B.  Definition of Professional Fiduciary  12.13
    • C.  Qualifications for Licensing
      • 1.  General Qualifications  12.14
      • 2.  Educational Qualifications  12.15
    • D.  Form: Licensing Application: Professional Fiduciary  12.16
    • E.  Annual Statement and License Renewal  12.17
    • F.  Oversight by Professional Fiduciaries Bureau  12.18

13

Duties and Powers of Conservators of the Person

Ruth A. Phelps

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  13.1
  • II.  OBLIGATIONS OF CONSERVATOR OF THE PERSON  13.2
    • A.  Narrowing or Broadening Conservator’s Powers and Responsibilities  13.3
    • B.  No Personal Obligation to Provide Financial Support  13.4
    • C.  Protecting Conservatee From Elder Abuse  13.5
    • D.  Liability of Conservator of the Person for Failure to Perform Duties  13.6
    • E.  Fiduciary Conflicts of Interest  13.7
    • F.  Protecting Against Liability of Estate and Conservator for Actions of Conservatee
      • 1.  Institutionalizing Conservatee Causing Harm to Self or Others  13.8
      • 2.  Liability Insurance  13.9
  • III.  ESTABLISHING PLACE OF RESIDENCE  13.10
    • A.  Restrictions on Conservator’s Choice of Appropriate Residence
      • 1.  Least Restrictive Residence and Appropriate Level of Care  13.10A
      • 2.  Form: Determination of Conservatee’s Appropriate Level of Care (Judicial Council Form GC-355)  13.10B
      • 3.  Locked and Secured-Perimeter Facilities  13.11
    • B.  Procedures for Establishing Residence
      • 1.  Court Authorization Generally Not Required to Establish Residence in California  13.12
      • 2.  Court Order Required to Establish Residence Outside California  13.13
        • a.  Permanent Change of Residence Versus Temporary Visit  13.14
        • b.  Policy Considerations  13.15
        • c.  Practical Considerations  13.16
        • d.  Form: Petition to Fix Residence Outside the State of California (Judicial Council Form GC-085)  13.17
        • e.  Form: Order Fixing Residence Outside the State of California (Judicial Council Form GC-090)  13.18
      • 3.  Notice
        • a.  When Required  13.18A
        • b.  Pre-Move Notice of Change of Personal Residence
          • (1)  Statutory Requirements  13.18B
          • (2)  Form: Pre-Move Notice of Proposed Change of Personal Residence of Conservatee or Ward (Judicial Council Forms GC-079 and GC-079(MA))  13.18C
        • c.  Notice of Petition to Establish Residence Outside California  13.18D
        • d.  Post-Move Notice of Change of Residence
          • (1)  Statutory Requirements  13.18E
          • (2)  Form: Post-Move Notice of Change of Residence of Conservatee or Ward (Judicial Council Forms GC-080 and GC-080(MA))  13.19
  • IV.  MEDICAL TREATMENT OF CONSERVATEE
    • A.  General Considerations
      • 1.  Conservatee Presumed to Have Capacity to Give Informed Consent  13.20
      • 2.  When Health Care Decisions May Be Made by Conservator  13.21
      • 3.  When Prob C §§2357 and 1880 Petitions Are Appropriate  13.22
      • 4.  Placement in Locked or Secured-Perimeter Facility  13.23
        • a.  Involuntary Placement in Mental Health Facility  13.24
        • b.  Petition for Instructions Under Prob C §2359  13.25
      • 5.  Experimental Drugs, Convulsive Electroshock Treatment, Sterilization  13.26
      • 6.  HIV Testing  13.26A
      • 7.  Relationship of Conservator to Advance Health Care Directive and to Health Care Agent  13.27
      • 8.  Right to Refuse Life-Sustaining Treatment  13.28
        • a.  Conservatee With Advance Health Care Directive  13.29
        • b.  Conservatee Without Advance Health Care Directive  13.30
      • 9.  Court’s Power to Refer Conservatee to Mental Health Assessment  13.30A
    • B.  No Court Approval Necessary in Emergencies  13.31
    • C.  Probate Code §2357 Petition to Authorize or Compel Conservator’s Consent to Medical Treatment
      • 1.  Need for Finding of Conservatee’s Incapacity in Prob C §2357 Petition  13.32
      • 2.  Appointment of Counsel for Conservatee
        • a.  Appointment When Prob C §2357(b) Petition Is Filed  13.33
        • b.  Appointment When Prob C §2357(i) Petition Is Filed  13.34
      • 3.  The Prob C §2357(b) Petition  13.35
      • 4.  Form: Petition to Authorize Conservator to Give Consent to Medical Treatment (Prob C §2357(b))  13.36
      • 5.  The Prob C §2357(i) Petition  13.37
      • 6.  Form: Petition to Compel Conservator of Person to Consent to and Obtain Medical Treatment for Conservatee (Prob C §2357(i))  13.38
      • 7.  Notice and Other Procedural Issues  13.39
      • 8.  Order Authorizing or Compelling Medical Treatment  13.40
      • 9.  Form: Order Authorizing or Compelling Medical Treatment or Consent  13.41
    • D.  Probate Code §§1880, 1891 Petition for Determination of Incapacity to Give Informed Consent and Authority of Conservator to Make Health Care Decisions  13.42
      • 1.  Effect of Grant of Prob C §2355 Powers  13.43
      • 2.  Limitations and Restrictions on Conservator’s Authority  13.44
      • 3.  Procedure
        • a.  When to Make Request and Who May Petition  13.45
        • b.  Contents of the Petition
          • (1)  At Time of Appointment  13.46
          • (2)  After Appointment (Judicial Council Form GC-380)  13.47
        • c.  Form: Petition for Exclusive Authority to Give Consent for Medical Treatment (Judicial Council Form GC-380)  13.48
        • d.  Citation and Notice  13.49
        • e.  Hearing  13.50
        • f.  Order  13.51
        • g.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Give Consent for Medical Treatment (Judicial Council Form GC-385)  13.52
        • h.  Letters of Conservatorship  13.53
      • 4.  Modification or Revocation of Prob C §1880 Order  13.54
      • 5.  Compelling Conservator to Give Consent and Obtain Recommended Treatment After Prob C §1880 Order Obtained  13.55
        • a.  Petition  13.56
        • b.  Order  13.57
    • E.  Major Neurocognitive Disorder or “Dementia”
      • 1.  Need for Special Conservatorship Powers  13.58
      • 2.  Definitions  13.59
      • 3.  Procedure
        • a.  Who May File Petition  13.60
        • b.  Ex Parte Petition  13.60A
        • c.  Notice  13.61
        • d.  Personal Attendance; Representation by Counsel; Attorney Fees  13.62
      • 4.  Evidence and Required Court Findings  13.63
      • 5.  The Forms  13.64
      • 6.  Form: Attachment Requesting Special Orders Regarding a Major Neurocognitive Disorder (Judicial Council Form GC-313)  13.65
      • 7.  Form: Petition for Authority to Place Conservatee in a Locked Facility and/or to Consent to the Administration of Medications (Prob C §§2356.5(b)–(c), 2357)  13.66
      • 8.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Place Conservatee in a Locked Facility and/or to Consent to the Administration of Medications (Prob C §§2356.5(b)–(c), 2357)  13.67
      • 9.  Periodic Court Investigation  13.68
    • F.  End of Life Option Act
      • 1.  Conservator Lacks Authority to Request End of Life Option  13.69
      • 2.  Request for End of Life Option Is Not Ground for Conservatorship  13.70
    • G.  Disposition of Conservatee’s Remains  13.71

14

Duties and Powers of Conservators of the Estate

Michael J. Gill

  • I.  SOURCES OF DUTIES AND POWERS
    • A.  Standard of Care
      • 1.  California Rules of Court 7.1059  14.1
      • 2.  Fiduciary Relationship  14.1A
      • 3.  Duties of Ordinary Care  14.2
      • 4.  Duty to Accommodate Desires of Conservatee  14.2A
      • 5.  Liability for Breach of Fiduciary Duty  14.3
    • B.  Statutory Powers and Duties  14.4
    • C.  Additional Powers  14.5
    • D.  Chart: Powers of Conservator of Estate  14.6
  • II.  CONFLICTS AND OTHER PROBLEMS IN ESTATE MANAGEMENT
    • A.  Avoidance of Conflicts of Interest With Conservatee (Cal Rules of Ct 7.1059(a))  14.6A
    • B.  Transactions in Which Conservator Has Conflict of Interest  14.7
      • 1.  Removal for Adverse Interest That Creates Unreasonable Risk  14.8
      • 2.  Creditor May Be Conservator but Not Petitioner  14.9
      • 3.  Transactions Requiring Disclosure and Court Approval  14.10
        • a.  Conservator May Not Hire or Refer to an Entity in Which Conservator Has Financial Interest  14.11
        • b.  Limitations on Investments by Trust Company Acting as Conservator  14.11A
        • c.  Sales, Leases, or Rentals of Estate Property to Third Party With Family or Affiliate Relationship to Conservator  14.12
        • d.  Advancements Bearing Interest  14.13
        • e.  Compromise of Claim By or Against Conservator  14.14
        • f.  Distribution of Excess Income, Substituted Judgment, and Other Actions That May Require Court Authorization  14.15
    • C.  Probate Court Personnel Prohibited From Participating in Transactions  14.16
    • D.  Relationship Between Conservator of the Estate and Holder of Durable Power of Attorney  14.17
  • III.  DUTIES OF SUPPORT
    • A.  Support of Conservatee  14.18
    • B.  Support of Others  14.19
    • C.  Required Payments  14.20
    • D.  Determination of Amount of Support  14.21
    • E.  Court Orders Authorizing or Compelling Support  14.22
      • 1.  Petition for Advance Authorization  14.23
        • a.  Use of Petition When There Are Different Fiduciaries Involved  14.24
        • b.  Preparing the Petition; Notice  14.25
        • c.  Form: Petition for Authority to Expend Estate Money for Support and Maintenance  14.26
        • d.  The Order  14.27
        • e.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Expend Estate Money for Support and Maintenance  14.28
      • 2.  Petition to Compel Payments for Support  14.29
        • a.  Failure to Provide Support  14.30
        • b.  Failure to Pay for Services or Items Received  14.31
        • c.  Failure to Pay Creditors of Conservatee  14.32
        • d.  Form: Petition for Order Directing Conservator to Furnish Support  14.33
        • e.  Form: Order Directing Conservator to Furnish Support  14.34
      • 3.  Effect of Liability of Others to Support Conservatee  14.35
        • a.  Form: Petition for Order Directing Conservatee’s Support From Estate Despite Liability of Others  14.36
        • b.  Form: Order Directing Conservatee’s Support From Estate Despite Liability of Others  14.37
    • F.  Payments to Conservatee for Personal Use  14.38
      • 1.  Method of Payment  14.39
      • 2.  Capacity to Contract for Purchase of Necessaries of Life  14.40
      • 3.  Consideration of Conservatee’s Wages  14.41
      • 4.  Form: Petition for Authority to Pay Conservatee Allowance for Personal Use  14.42
      • 5.  Form: Order Authorizing Payment of Allowance to Conservatee for Personal Use  14.43
    • G.  Summary Procedure to Enforce Support Obligations of Spouse or Domestic Partner With Capacity  14.44
  • IV.  INDEPENDENT EXERCISE OF POWERS  14.45
    • A.  Powers Exercisable Without Prob C §2590 Order  14.46
    • B.  Standard for Granting Independent Powers; Limitations  14.47
    • C.  List of Independent Powers  14.48
    • D.  Petitioning for Grant of Independent Powers  14.49
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Order Granting Independent Powers  14.50
      • 2.  The Order  14.51
      • 3.  Form: Order Granting Independent Powers to Conservator  14.52
    • E.  Withdrawal or Subsequent Limitation of Independent Powers  14.53
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Withdrawal or Limitation of Independent Powers  14.54
      • 2.  The Order  14.55
      • 3.  Form: Order Withdrawing or Limiting Independent Powers  14.56
    • F.  New Letters of Conservatorship  14.57
  • V.  DISTRIBUTION OF SURPLUS INCOME OF CONSERVATEE’S ESTATE (PROB C §2423)  14.58
    • A.  Determining Amount of Surplus and Amount to Be Distributed  14.59
    • B.  Substituted Judgment Proceeding as an Alternative to Prob C §2423 Proceeding  14.60
    • C.  Form: Petition for Authority to Distribute Surplus Income to Relatives of Conservatee  14.61
    • D.  The Order  14.62
    • E.  Form: Order Authorizing Distribution of Surplus Income to Relatives of Conservatee  14.63
  • VI.  OTHER MANAGEMENT POWERS OR DUTIES
    • A.  Representation in Actions and Proceedings  14.64
    • B.  Abandonment of Valueless Property  14.65
    • C.  Management of Community Property
      • 1.  Nonconserved Spouse’s or Domestic Partner’s Right to Control Community Property Not Affected  14.66
        • a.  Agreement to Have Conservator Manage Community Property  14.67
        • b.  If Both Spouses or Domestic Partners Have Conservators, One-Half of Community Property in Each Conservatorship  14.68
      • 2.  Determining the Character of Property  14.69
      • 3.  Probate Code §3100 Proceeding for Particular Transaction  14.70
    • D.  Joinder or Consent by Conservator in Lieu of Conservatee Spouse or Domestic Partner  14.71
    • E.  Filing Tax Returns
      • 1.  Income Tax Returns  14.72
        • a.  Income Tax Treatment of Payments Made by Conservator of Estate  14.73
        • b.  If Conservatee Has Not Previously Filed Tax Returns or Paid Taxes  14.74
      • 2.  Gift Tax Returns  14.75
      • 3.  Payment of Miscellaneous Taxes  14.76
    • F.  Recording Letters of Conservatorship in Counties Where Real Property Is Located  14.77
    • G.  Management of Law Practice of Lawyer Conservatee  14.78
    • H.  Supervision of the Management of Assets Outside the Conservatorship  14.79
    • I.  Disposition of Conservatee’s Remains  14.79A
  • VII.  COURT INSTRUCTIONS, APPROVAL, AND CONFIRMATION
    • A.  When No Prior Authorization Is Required  14.80
    • B.  Petition for Instructions (Prob C §2403)  14.81
    • C.  Fees for Petition for Instructions  14.82

15

Debts, Borrowing, Compromises, and Modifications of Obligations

Michael J. Gill

Alex R. Borden

  • I.  COLLECTION OR PAYMENT OF DEBTS
    • A.  Payment of Undisputed Debts Owed by Conservatee or by Estate
      • 1.  Debts Incurred Before Creation of Conservatorship  15.1
      • 2.  Wage Claims for Work Done or Services Rendered Before Petition for Appointment Filed
        • a.  Priority of Wage Claims  15.2
        • b.  Payment When Part or All of Claim Is in Doubt  15.3
      • 3.  Debts Incurred by Conservatee After Creation of Conservatorship
        • a.  Necessaries and Items Purchased Under Conservatee’s Broadened Capacity to Contract  15.4
          • (1)  Limitations  15.5
          • (2)  Petition for Instructions  15.6
        • b.  Torts of Conservatee  15.7
      • 4.  Administration Expenses  15.8
      • 5.  Advancements by Conservator  15.9
      • 6.  Creditors’ Remedies  15.10
        • a.  Prohibition Against Execution Levy  15.11
        • b.  Payment of Interest  15.12
        • c.  Form: Petition for Order Directing Conservator to Pay Debt  15.13
        • d.  Notice  15.14
        • e.  Form: Order Directing Conservator to Pay Debt  15.15
    • B.  Disputed Claims Owed by Conservatee or by Estate
      • 1.  Wage Claims  15.16
      • 2.  Creditors’ Remedies  15.17
      • 3.  Referral to Judge Pro Tem or Probate Judge; Arbitration  15.18
      • 4.  Specific Enforcement of Contracts to Convey Real or Personal Property  15.19
    • C.  Source of Payment of Debts and Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts  15.20
    • D.  Priority of Payment of Debts  15.21
    • E.  Petition for Instructions About Title to Assets and Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts and Expenses  15.22
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Instructions on Title to Certain Assets and on Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts and Expenses  15.23
      • 2.  Form: Order Instructing Conservator on Title to Certain Assets and Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts and Expenses  15.24
    • F.  Collection of Debts Owed to Conservatee
      • 1.  Conservator May Collect  15.25
      • 2.  Possible Proceedings  15.26
    • G.  Property Claimed to Belong to Conservatee or Other Person
      • 1.  Transfer of Property Under Prob C §§850–859  15.27
      • 2.  Receivership Under CCP §§564–570  15.28
      • 3.  Notice  15.29
      • 4.  Limitations on Use of Prob C §§850–859  15.30
        • a.  Another Civil Action Pending  15.31
        • b.  Improper Venue  15.32
      • 5.  Discovery  15.32A
      • 6.  Response by Way of Objections  15.33
      • 7.  Form: Petition for Order Authorizing and Directing Transfer of Property  15.34
      • 8.  Form: Order Authorizing and Directing Transfer of Property  15.35
      • 9.  Actions to Be Taken After Order Is Obtained  15.36
      • 10.  Effect of Order  15.37
  • II.  BORROWING
    • A.  Permissible Purposes  15.38
    • B.  Borrowing Versus Selling  15.39
      • 1.  Availability of Loan Proceeds for Support of Conservatee  15.40
      • 2.  Tax Effects  15.41
    • C.  Court Authorization Required  15.42
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Authority to Borrow Funds  15.43
      • 2.  Order; Additional Bond  15.44
      • 3.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Borrow Funds  15.45
    • D.  Lenders’ Rights  15.46
  • III.  Compromise or Settlement of Claims and Actions; Extension, Renewal, or Modification of Obligations  15.47
    • A.  When Court Authorization and Approval Required  15.48
    • B.  Proper Court for Approving Compromise or Settlement  15.49
    • C.  Petition for Court Approval  15.50
    • D.  Form: Petition to Extend, Renew, or Modify Obligation Owing to Conservatee or Estate  15.51
    • E.  Notice; Order  15.52
    • F.  Form: Order Extending, Renewing, or Modifying Obligation Owing to Conservatee or Estate  15.53

16

Investments, Deposits, and Insurance

Michael J. Gill

Alex R. Borden

  • I.  INVESTMENTS BY CONSERVATOR  16.1
    • A.  Investments Requiring Court Authorization  16.2
    • B.  The Problem of Statutory Limitations on Investment Options in Large Conservatorship Estates  16.3
    • C.  Form: Petition for Authority to Invest Funds  16.4
    • D.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Invest Funds  16.5
    • E.  Investments Permitted Without Court Authorization  16.6
  • II.  RETIREMENT PLANS
    • A.  Conservator’s Powers Regarding Retirement Plans  16.7
    • B.  Investment of Retirement Plans  16.8
    • C.  Withdrawals From Retirement Plans  16.9
    • D.  Changing Retirement Plan Beneficiary Designations  16.10
  • III.  CONSERVATEE’S MONEY, STOCKS, AND BONDS
    • A.  Cash Deposits
      • 1.  Deposits Without Court Authorization  16.11
      • 2.  Deposits Subject to Withdrawal Only With Court Authorization  16.12
      • 3.  Conservatee’s Accounts  16.13
      • 4.  When Notification to Court Is Required  16.13A
    • B.  Deposit of Conservatee’s Personal Property or Securities  16.14
    • C.  Corporate Shares and Memberships in Nonprofit Corporations  16.15
    • D.  Mutual Funds  16.16
  • IV.  INSURANCE
    • A.  Liability and Casualty Insurance  16.17
    • B.  Other Insurance  16.18

17

Sales and Real Property Transactions

Michael J. Gill

Alex R. Borden

  • I.  SALES
    • A.  Authorized Purposes
      • 1.  Reasons for Sale  17.1
      • 2.  Best Interests of Conservatee  17.1A
    • B.  Court Involvement Required; Exceptions  17.2
    • C.  Required Disclosures; Prohibited Purchasers  17.3
    • D.  Terms and Conduct of Sale; Use of Proceeds  17.4
    • E.  Procedure for Sales  17.5
      • 1.  Published Notice of Intent to Sell  17.6
      • 2.  Shortening Time for Notice; Postponing Sales  17.7
      • 3.  Notice of Hearing of Petition for Confirmation of Sale  17.8
    • F.  Sale of Securities
      • 1.  When Court Authorization Is and Is Not Required  17.9
      • 2.  Use of the Judicial Council Form  17.10
      • 3.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Authority to Sell Securities and Order (Judicial Council Form DE-270, GC-070)  17.11
    • G.  Sales of Tangible Personal Property  17.12
      • 1.  Sales Without Notice, Court Approval, or Confirmation  17.13
      • 2.  Seeking Court Authorization Even If Not Required  17.14
      • 3.  Sales Requiring Notice, Court Approval, and Confirmation  17.15
        • a.  Sale by Public Auction  17.16
        • b.  Private Sale  17.17
      • 4.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Approval of Sale of Personal Property and Order (Judicial Council Form DE-275, GC-075)  17.18
    • H.  Sales of Other Assets
      • 1.  Leasehold Interests  17.19
      • 2.  Partnership Interests  17.20
      • 3.  Secured or Unsecured Notes  17.21
      • 4.  Mining Property  17.22
      • 5.  Contract to Purchase  17.23
      • 6.  Choses in Action and Pledged Personal Property  17.24
    • I.  Default on Sale by Purchaser—Resale  17.25
    • J.  Action of Conservatee to Recover Property Sold  17.26
    • K.  Valueless Property  17.27
  • II.  REAL PROPERTY
    • A.  Purchase of Real Property  17.28
    • B.  Purchase of Replacement Residence After Sale of Existing Residence  17.29
    • C.  Maintenance, Repairs, and Insurance  17.30
    • D.  Sale of Real Property Under Independent Powers
      • 1.  General Rules  17.30A
      • 2.  Conservatee’s Present or Former Personal Residence  17.30B
    • E.  Sale of Real Property Absent Independent Powers  17.31
      • 1.  Sale of Conservatee’s Personal Residence  17.32
        • a.  Timing of Presentation of Information to Court  17.33
        • b.  Ex Parte Application to Sell Residence  17.34
        • c.  Form: Petition for Authorization to Sell Conservatee’s Residence  17.35
        • d.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Sell Conservatee’s Residence  17.36
      • 2.  Permissible Terms of Sale  17.37
      • 3.  Use of Brokers or Agents  17.38
        • a.  Ex Parte Application and Order for Exclusive Listing  17.39
        • b.  Form: Ex Parte Application for Authority to Grant Exclusive Right to Sell Real Property  17.40
        • c.  Form: Ex Parte Order Authorizing Conservator to Grant Exclusive Right to Sell Real Property  17.41
      • 4.  Mechanics of Sale  17.42
      • 5.  Bid for Purchase of Real Property  17.43
      • 6.  Confirmation of Sale  17.44
        • a.  Overbids  17.45
        • b.  Defaulting Buyer  17.46
        • c.  Preparation of Report of Sale and Petition for Order Confirming Sale of Real Property (Judicial Council Form DE-260, GC-060)
          • (1)  Manner and Terms of Sale  17.47
          • (2)  Commission  17.48
          • (3)  Other Items  17.49
        • d.  Form: Report of Sale and Petition for Order Confirming Sale of Real Property (Judicial Council Form DE-260/GC-060)  17.50
        • e.  The Hearing  17.51
        • f.  Preparation of Order Confirming the Sale of Real Property (Judicial Council Form DE-265/GC-065)  17.52
        • g.  Form: Order Confirming Sale of Real Property (Judicial Council Form DE-265/GC-065)  17.53
      • 7.  Conservator Deed
        • a.  Preparation of Deed  17.54
        • b.  Form: Conservator’s Deed Conveying Real Property  17.55
    • F.  Leases
      • 1.  When Court Authorization Not Required  17.56
      • 2.  When Court Authorization Required  17.57
        • a.  Other Offers Made at Hearing  17.58
        • b.  Form: Petition for Authority to Lease Real or Personal Property  17.59
        • c.  The Order  17.60
        • d.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Lease Real or Personal Property  17.61
      • 3.  Multiple Owners; Lessee’s Rights  17.62
    • G.  Partition
      • 1.  Advisability  17.63
      • 2.  Court Supervision  17.64
      • 3.  Partition Action Brought by Conservator
        • a.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Authority to Commence Partition Action  17.65
        • b.  Form: Ex Parte Order Authorizing Partition of Real or Personal Property  17.66
      • 4.  Partition by Agreement  17.67
        • a.  Form: Petition for Authority to Execute Partition Agreement of Real or Personal Property  17.68
        • b.  Form: Order Authorizing Execution of Partition Agreement of Real or Personal Property  17.69
    • H.  Acceptance of Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure  17.70
      • 1.  Considerations  17.71
      • 2.  Form: Petition for Authority to Accept Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure  17.72
      • 3.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Accept Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure  17.73
    • I.  Dedicating Land or Granting Easements  17.74
      • 1.  Court Proceeding  17.75
      • 2.  Form: Petition for Authority to Dedicate or Convey Real Property  17.76
      • 3.  Form: Order Authorizing Conservator to Dedicate or Convey Real Property  17.77
    • J.  Contaminated Real Property
      • 1.  California Law  17.78
      • 2.  Federal Law  17.79
    • K.  Exchange of Property  17.80
      • 1.  Petition and Order  17.81
      • 2.  Form: Petition for Authority to Exchange Property  17.82
      • 3.  Form: Order Authorizing Exchange of Property  17.83

18

Substituted Judgment

Neil F. Horton

  • I.  INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Uses for Substituted Judgment Proceedings  18.1
    • B.  Alternatives to Substituted Judgment  18.2
    • C.  Permissible Purposes  18.3
    • D.  Permissible Transactions  18.4
    • E.  Applicability of Cal Rules of Ct 7.1059  18.4A
    • F.  Recognition by IRS  18.5
  • II.  PROCEDURE
    • A.  Who May File  18.6
    • B.  Appointment of Counsel for Conservatee  18.7
    • C.  Notice of Hearing  18.8
  • III.  FACTORS FOR COURT TO CONSIDER  18.9
    • A.  Objective Standard: Reasonably Prudent Person  18.10
    • B.  Administrative Expenses  18.11
    • C.  Disqualified Beneficiaries [Deleted]  18.12
  • IV.  BUILDING THE RECORD  18.13
    • A.  Conservatee’s Existing Estate Plan  18.14
    • B.  Conservatee’s Testimony  18.15
    • C.  Evidence of Conservatee’s Past Donative Practices  18.16
    • D.  Financial Information  18.17
    • E.  Tax Returns  18.18
    • F.  Other Evidentiary Problems  18.19
  • V.  DONATIVE TRANSFERS (“GIFTS”)  18.20
    • A.  Petition for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers  18.21
    • B.  Form: Petition for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers  18.22
    • C.  Order for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers  18.23
    • D.  Form: Order for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers  18.24
  • VI.  REVOCABLE TRUST AND POUR-OVER WILL
    • A.  Reasons for Creating Revocable Trust and Pour-Over Will  18.25
    • B.  Effect on Conservatorship  18.26
    • C.  Requirements for Substituted Judgment Trusts Under Cal Rules of Ct 7.903  18.27
      • 1.  Increased Costs Under Cal Rules of Ct 7.903  18.28
      • 2.  Investment Restrictions Under Cal Rules of Ct 7.903  18.29
    • D.  Form: Petition for Substituted Judgment to Create and Fund Revocable Trust and to Execute Pour-Over Will  18.30
    • E.  Proposed Revocable Trust Created Under Substituted Judgment
      • 1.  Contents of Trust  18.31
      • 2.  Form: Proposed Revocable Trust Created Under Substituted Judgment  18.32
    • F.  Pour-Over Will  18.33
    • G.  Form: Pour-Over Will  18.34
    • H.  Form: Order for Substituted Judgment to Create and Fund Revocable Trust  18.35
  • VII.  IRREVOCABLE SPECIAL NEEDS TRUST  18.35A
  • VIII.  USING SUBSTITUTED JUDGMENT TRUST TO SETTLE CONTESTED CONSERVATORSHIP PETITION
    • A.  Conflicting Interests  18.36
    • B.  Stipulated Settlement  18.37
    • C.  Content of Sample Petition and Trust  18.38
    • D.  Form: Petition to Establish and Fund Trust and to Appoint Trust Protector Pursuant to Settlement Agreement  18.39
    • E.  Form: Proposed Revocable Trust Created Under Settlement Agreement  18.40

19

Accounting

Peter S. Stern

  • I.  INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Conservator’s Collection of Data  19.1
    • B.  Tax Planning Issues  19.1A
  • II.  ACCOUNTING BASICS
    • A.  When to Account
      • 1.  Periodic Accounts  19.1B
      • 2.  On Court Order  19.1C
      • 3.  Voluntary Accounts  19.1D
      • 4.  Final Account  19.2
      • 5.  Account Not Required for Small Estates  19.3
    • B.  General Scope of Court Oversight
      • 1.  Court Responsibility to Ensure Compliance  19.3A
      • 2.  Court May Review Account Any Time; Sanctions for Material Error  19.4
    • C.  Failure to File Timely Account
      • 1.  Compelling an Accounting  19.5
      • 2.  Sanctions  19.6
  • III.  REQUESTING ALLOWABLE EXPENSES  19.7
    • A.  Support and Maintenance Payments  19.8
    • B.  Miscellaneous Administrative Expenses  19.9
    • C.  Debts  19.10
    • D.  Fees for Conservator and Attorney  19.11
  • IV.  PREPARING COURT ACCOUNT
    • A.  Standard or Simplified Accounting  19.11A
      • 1.  When Standard Accounting Is Required  19.11B
      • 2.  When Standard Accounting May Be Preferred  19.11C
      • 3.  When to Use Simplified Accounting  19.11D
      • 4.  Judicial Council Account Forms  19.11E
        • a.  Optional Judicial Council Forms for Use in Standard Accounts Only  19.11F
        • b.  Judicial Council Forms for Mandatory Use in Simplified Accounts, Optional Use in Standard Accounts  19.11G
      • 5.  Standard Account Requirements  19.11H
    • B.  Contents of Account
      • 1.  All Accounts  19.12
        • a.  Summary of Account  19.13
        • b.  Form: Summary of Account—Standard and Simplified Accounts (Judicial Council Form GC-400(SUM)/GC-405(SUM))  19.13A
        • c.  Schedules
          • (1)  Required Under Prob C §1062  19.14
            • (a)  Net Income or Loss From Trade or Business  19.14A
            • (b)  Charges and Credits  19.14B
          • (2)  Required Under Prob C §1063  19.15
          • (3)  Format of Schedules  19.16
        • d.  Other Required Information
          • (1)  Report on Conservatee’s Right to Vote  19.17
          • (2)  Documents That Must Be Submitted With Account  19.18
            • (a)  Account Statements From Financial and Other Institutions  19.18A
            • (b)  Enhanced Requirements for Professional Fiduciaries Serving As Conservators  19.18B
            • (c)  Escrow Statements  19.18C
            • (d)  Care Facility Statements  19.18D
            • (e)  Documents That Contain Conservatee’s Personal Information  19.18E
          • (3)  Other Possible Attachments or Information Required Under Local Rules  19.19
      • 2.  Final Account  19.20
      • 3.  Final Account Following Death of Conservatee  19.21
    • C.  Contents of Petition  19.22
      • 1.  Description of Financial Transactions  19.23
      • 2.  Explanation of Unusual Items  19.24
      • 3.  Disclosure of Family Relationships  19.25
      • 4.  Allegations of Cash Investments  19.26
      • 5.  Request for Compensation  19.27
    • D.  Statement Regarding Sufficiency of Bond  19.27A
    • E.  Form: Petition to Approve Conservator’s Account  19.28
      • 1.  Caption  19.29
      • 2.  Introduction  19.30
      • 3.  Status of Estate: Summary of Account  19.31
      • 4.  Services of Conservator of Estate
        • a.  Details of Transactions During Account Period  19.32
        • b.  Description of Services  19.33
        • c.   Reporting Fees Paid on Account to Professional Fiduciaries  19.33A
      • 5.  Attorney Fees  19.34
      • 6.  Conservator of Person  19.35
      • 7.  Notice  19.36
      • 8.  Verification  19.37
    • F.  Sample Standard Account
      • 1.  Description of Hypothetical Conservatorship  19.38
      • 2.  Form: Sample Inventory and Appraisal and Supplemental Inventory Figures  19.38A
      • 3.  Form: Sample Summary of Account  19.39
      • 4.  Activities Described in Sample Categorized Schedules  19.40
      • 5.  Form: Schedules PH(1) and PH(2): Assets on Hand at Beginning of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash  19.41
      • 6.  Form: Schedule AP: Additional Property Received During Period of Account  19.41A
      • 7.  Schedule A: Receipts During Period of Account
        • a.  Form: Schedule A: Receipts During Period of Account  19.41B
        • b.  Preparation of Schedule A  19.41C
        • c.  Only Noncapital Receipts Shown  19.42
        • d.  Stock Splits or Dividends; Reinvested Dividends; Additional Shares Acquired  19.43
        • e.  Recurring Income Items  19.44
      • 8.  Treatment of Return of Principal
        • a.  How to Account  19.44A
        • b.  Form: Schedule A1: Return of Principal  19.45
      • 9.  Schedule B: Gains on Sales
        • a.  Form: Schedule B: Gains on Sales  19.46
        • b.  Treatment of Gains on Sales Different for Income Tax Purposes  19.47
      • 10.  Schedule C: Disbursements During Period of Account
        • a.  Form: Schedule C: Disbursements During Period of Account  19.48
        • b.  Preparation of Schedule C  19.48A
        • c.  Practical Considerations Regarding Recurring Expense Items  19.49
        • d.  Recordkeeping to Support Expenditures  19.50
        • e.  Disbursements for Investments  19.51
        • f.  Disbursements Made to Third Parties for Conservatee’s Support  19.52
        • g.  Real Estate Sales and Other Expenses  19.53
      • 11.  Form: Schedule D: Losses on Sales  19.54
      • 12.  Form: Schedule DIST: Distributions to Conservatee  19.54A
      • 13.  Schedule E: Property on Hand at End of Account Period
        • a.  Form: Schedule E: Property on Hand at End of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash  19.55
        • b.  Separate Descriptions Required  19.56
        • c.  Carry Value Defined  19.57
      • 14.  Schedule F: Changes in Form of Assets
        • a.  Form: Schedule F: Changes in Form of Assets  19.58
        • b.  Preparation of Schedule F; Transactions for Which Reporting Is Required  19.59
      • 15.  Schedule of Liabilities
        • a.  Form: Schedule G: Liabilities at End of Account Period  19.60
        • b.  Liabilities for Which Reporting Is Required  19.61
      • 16.  Schedule of Out-of-State Real Property
        • a.  Form: Schedule ____: Out-of-State Real Property  19.61A
        • b.  Requirement to List Out-of-State Real Property  19.62
    • G.  Sample Simplified Account
      • 1.  Description of Hypothetical Conservatorship  19.62A
      • 2.  Form: Inventory and Appraisal Figures  19.62B
      • 3.  Summary of Account, 6/1/17–5/31/18  19.62C
      • 4.  Property on Hand at Beginning of Account Period
        • a.  Preparation  19.62D
        • b.  Form: Schedules PH(1) and PH(2): Property on Hand at Beginning of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash  19.62E
      • 5.  Activities Described in Sample Schedules  19.62F
      • 6.  Schedule A: Receipts
        • a.  Preparation of Schedule A  19.62G
        • b.  Form: Schedule A: Receipts  19.62H
      • 7.  Disbursements
        • a.  Preparation  19.62I
        • b.  Form: Schedule C: Disbursements  19.62J
      • 8.  Property on Hand at End of Account Period
        • a.  Preparation  19.62K
        • b.  Form: Schedule E: Property on Hand at End of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash  19.62L
  • V.  COMPLYING WITH NOTICE AND HEARING REQUIREMENTS
    • A.  Obtaining Hearing Date  19.63
    • B.  Giving Notice of Hearing  19.64
      • 1.  Copies of Account  19.65
      • 2.  Conservatee in State Hospital  19.66
      • 3.  Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs  19.67
  • VI.  OBJECTING TO ACCOUNT
    • A.  Objections  19.68
    • B.  Surcharging Conservator  19.69
    • C.  Fees on Contests  19.70
  • VII.  SETTLING ACCOUNT
    • A.  Contents of Order Settling Account and Report of Conservator, Allowing Fees  19.71
    • B.  Form: Order Settling Account and Report of Conservator, Allowing Fees  19.72

20

Compensation

Bettie Baker Marshall

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  20.1
  • II.  GENERAL RULES APPLICABLE TO CONSERVATORS AND ATTORNEYS
    • A.  Basis for Compensation Calculation  20.2
    • B.  Court Authorization Generally Required Prior to Payment  20.3
    • C.  When Compensation May Be Sought; Who May Petition  20.4
    • D.  Importance of Local Rules  20.5
    • E.  Requirement of Detailed Statement of Facts  20.6
    • F.  Fees on Account
      • 1.  For Conservator  20.7
      • 2.  For Conservator’s Attorney  20.8
      • 3.  Form: Petition for Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees on Account  20.9
      • 4.  Form: Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees on Account  20.10
    • G.  Fees When Matters Are Contested
      • 1.  Fees When There Are Objections to Conservator’s Account  20.11
      • 2.  Fees for Unsuccessful Petition or Opposition to Petition for Appointment  20.12
      • 3.  Fees for Conservator’s Unsuccessful Opposition to Petition or Other Request  20.13
      • 4.  Importance of Assessing Risk of Litigation  20.14
    • H.  Fees When Conservatee Has Died  20.15
    • I.  Tax Consequences  20.16
  • III.  CONSERVATOR FEES
    • A.  Importance of Maintaining Time Records  20.17
    • B.  Conservator of the Person, the Estate, or Both
      • 1.  Guiding Principles  20.18
      • 2.  Factors Courts May Consider  20.19
    • C.  Conservator of the Person  20.20
    • D.  Conservator of the Estate
      • 1.  Considerations in Fee Awards  20.21
      • 2.  Fees Allowed at First Accounting  20.22
    • E.  Petition and Order Authorizing Payment of Fees to Conservator
      • 1.  Form: Petition for Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees  20.23
      • 2.  Form: Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees  20.24
    • F.  Professional Conservators  20.25
  • IV.  ATTORNEY FEES
    • A.  Attorney-Client Fee Agreements  20.26
      • 1.  Requirement of Written Agreement  20.27
      • 2.  Terms of Agreement  20.28
      • 3.  Form: Sample Clauses for Attorney-Client Fee Agreement  20.29
      • 4.  Types of Fee Agreements  20.30
    • B.  Court-Appointed Counsel for Conservatee  20.31
      • 1.  Practical Considerations; Local Rules and Policies  20.32
      • 2.  Discretionary or Mandatory Appointment Under Prob C §1470(a) or §1471  20.33
        • a.  When to Make Fee Request
          • (1)  By Oral Request at Hearing on Appointment of Conservator  20.34
          • (2)  By Petition at Conclusion of the Matter  20.35
        • b.  Form: Petition for Order for Attorney Fees Under Prob C §1472  20.36
        • c.  Form: Order to Pay Attorney Fees Under Prob C §1472  20.37
      • 3.  Discretionary Appointment Under Prob C §2620.2(c)(4)  20.38
    • C.  Counsel for Conservator  20.39
      • 1.  “Reasonable” Amount of Attorney Fees  20.40
      • 2.  Benefit to Conservatee  20.41
      • 3.  Attorney as Conservator  20.42
      • 4.  Form: Petition for Order to Pay Attorney Fees (Conservator’s Attorney)  20.43
      • 5.  Form: Order for Payment of Attorney Fees (Conservator’s Attorney)  20.44
    • D.  Fees for Paralegal Work  20.45
  • V.  SOURCES OF PAYMENT  20.46
    • A.  From Conservatee’s Estate  20.47
    • B.  From Conservatee’s Revocable Trust  20.48
      • 1.  Are Revocable Trust Assets Part of Conservatorship Estate?  20.49
      • 2.  Is Prior Court Approval Required?
        • a.  Argument That Prior Court Approval Is Not Required  20.50
        • b.  Argument That Prior Approval Is Required and Necessary  20.51
    • C.  From Conservatee Personally, or From County For Court-Appointed Counsel’s Fees  20.52
    • D.  From Third Party  20.53
    • E.  From Irrevocable Trust  20.54
    • F.  From Trust Funded by Court Order  20.55
    • G.  From Trust When Trustee Is Conservator  20.56
  • VI.  COLLECTION ISSUES
    • A.  Insolvent or Insufficiently Liquid Conservatorship Estate  20.57
    • B.  Collection Action Against Attorney’s Client  20.58
    • C.  Interest on Unpaid Fees  20.59

21

Conservatorship Termination

Patina A. Madison

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  21.1
  • II.  TERMINATION OF CONSERVATOR’S STATUS
    • A.  Effect on General Conservatorship  21.2
    • B.  Death, Removal, or Resignation of Co-Conservator
      • 1.  Continuation of Powers When Co-Conservator Dies, Is Removed, or Resigns  21.3
      • 2.  Petition for Amended Letters  21.4
      • 3.  Bond  21.5
      • 4.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship to Surviving or Remaining Conservator(s)  21.6
      • 5.  Order Directing Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship to Surviving or Remaining Conservator(s)  21.7
    • C.  Removal of Conservator
      • 1.  Grounds  21.8
        • a.  Termination of Marriage or Domestic Partnership  21.9
        • b.  Breach of Fiduciary Duty  21.10
        • c.  Abuse of Conservatee  21.11
      • 2.  Procedure
        • a.  Petition  21.12
        • b.  Form: Petition for Removal of Conservator, for Costs, Expenses, and Attorney Fees, and for Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship  21.13
        • c.  Notice  21.14
        • d.  Hearing  21.15
        • e.  Order  21.16
        • f.  Form: Order Removing Conservator, Awarding Costs, Expenses, and Attorney Fees, and Directing Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship  21.17
        • g.  Appeal  21.18
      • 3.  Suspension of Powers and Surrender of Estate Pending Hearing
        • a.  Court’s Authority; Petition  21.19
        • b.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Order Suspending Conservator’s Powers, Appointing Temporary Conservator, and Directing Surrender of Estate  21.20
        • c.  Order Suspending Conservator’s Powers, Appointing Temporary Conservator, and Directing Surrender of Estate  21.21
    • D.  Resignation of Conservator  21.22
    • E.  Filling Vacancy
      • 1.  Authority  21.23
      • 2.  Petition  21.24
      • 3.  Notice  21.25
      • 4.  Hearing  21.26
      • 5.  Order and Amended Letters of Conservatorship (for Successor Conservator)  21.27
      • 6.  Interim Appointment of Temporary Conservator  21.28
  • III.  TERMINATION OF PROCEEDINGS
    • A.  Termination by Court Order
      • 1.  Grounds  21.29
        • a.  Conservatee’s Improved Condition  21.30
        • b.  Exhaustion of Estate  21.31
        • c.  Transfer of All Personal Property Assets to Foreign Conservator  21.32
        • d.  Failure of Conservator to Make Conservatee Available for Court Investigator  21.33
        • e.  Return of Absentee Conservatee  21.34
      • 2.  Procedure
        • a.  Petition  21.35
        • b.  Form: Petition for Termination of Conservatorship  21.36
        • c.  Consolidation of Account, Petition for Termination of Conservatorship, and Discharge of Conservator  21.37
        • d.  Notice  21.38
        • e.  Delivering Court Investigator’s Report Before Hearing  21.38A
        • f.  Objections to and Support of Petition  21.39
        • g.  Court or Jury Trial  21.40
        • h.  Findings and Order  21.41
        • i.  Form: Order on Termination of Conservatorship  21.42
    • B.  Death of Conservatee
      • 1.  Before Hearing on Petition for Appointment  21.43
      • 2.  After Conservatorship Established  21.44
        • a.  Death of Conservatee Before Conservator’s Qualification  21.45
        • b.  Duty of Conservator to Deliver Assets  21.46
        • c.  Last-Illness Expenses, Disposing of Remains, and Other Expenses  21.47
        • d.  Summary Disposition of Conservatee’s Assets by Conservator  21.48
        • e.  Fees  21.49
        • f.  Notice of the Conservatee’s Death (Judicial Council Form GC-399)  21.49A
  • IV.  ACCOUNTING ON TERMINATION
    • A.  Continuing Duty of Conservator of Estate  21.50
    • B.  Before Inventory Filed  21.51
    • C.  Accounting in Two Parts on Death of Conservatee  21.52
    • D.  Deceased, Incapacitated, or Absconding Conservator  21.53
    • E.  Resignation or Removal of Conservator  21.54
    • F.  Final Account
      • 1.  Preparing Final Account  21.55
      • 2.  Form: Final Account  21.56
      • 3.  Notice  21.57
      • 4.  Objecting to Final Account  21.58
      • 5.  Form: Order Settling Final Account, Allowing Fees, and Ordering Delivery of Assets  21.59
      • 6.  Waiver of Final Account  21.59A
    • G.  Discharge of Conservator of Estate
      • 1.  Affidavit or Declaration Required  21.60
      • 2.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Final Discharge and Order (Judicial Council Form DE-295/GC-395)  21.61

22

Limited Conservatorships

Linda S. Durston

Polly Levin

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  22.1
    • A.  Purposes of Limited Conservatorships  22.2
    • B.  Major Differences From General Conservatorship  22.3
    • C.  Definition of Developmentally Disabled Adult for Whom Limited Conservatorship May Be Appropriate  22.4
      • 1.  Definition Excludes Mental Illness  22.5
      • 2.  Handicap Resulting From Brain Injury Occurring in Childhood or Adolescence  22.6
    • D.  Role of Regional Center  22.7
      • 1.  Services to Be Provided: Individual Program Plan  22.7A
      • 2.  Obtaining Authorization to Communicate With and Obtain Records From Regional Center  22.7B
    • E.  Form: Authorization and Consent for Regional Center Assessment and Release of Information  22.8
  • II.  ESTABLISHMENT OF LIMITED CONSERVATORSHIP
    • A.  Preliminary Steps  22.9
      • 1.  Interview Proposed Limited Conservator  22.10
      • 2.  Consider Requirement of Bond for Limited Conservator of the Estate  22.11
      • 3.  Consider Role of Regional Center; Contact Before Filing Petition  22.12
      • 4.  Identify Medical Practitioner Who Will Provide Capacity Declaration  22.13
      • 5.  Consider Alternatives to Limited Conservatorship for Medical Powers  22.14
    • B.  Limited Conservatorship Proceedings
      • 1.  The Petition  22.15
        • a.  Describe Nature and Degree of Disability (Item 5f)  22.16
        • b.  Conservator Powers and Conservatee Limitations Must Be Specifically Requested  22.17
          • (1)  Limited Conservator of the Person  22.18
          • (2)  Limited Conservator of the Estate  22.19
          • (3)  Petition for Authority to Establish Special Needs Trust  22.19A
          • (4)  Form: Attachment 1i to Petition  22.20
          • (5)  Form: Attachment 1j to Petition  22.21
        • c.  Other Allegations (Items 5c-d)  22.22
      • 2.  Actions Before the Hearing
        • a.  Legal Representation for Proposed Limited Conservatee
          • (1)  Retention or Appointment  22.23
          • (2)  Fees and Costs for Legal Services  22.23A
        • b.  Citation and Notice  22.24
        • c.  Notice to Regional Center  22.25
        • d.  Assessment by Regional Center  22.26
        • e.  Contents and Preparation of Regional Center Report  22.27
        • f.  Submission of Report  22.28
        • g.  Court Investigation  22.29
      • 3.  The Hearing
        • a.  Who Must Be Present  22.30
        • b.  Instructions to Proposed Limited Conservatee  22.31
        • c.  Additional Responsibilities of Court at Hearing  22.32
        • d.  Proof at Hearing  22.33
        • e.  Order Appointing Limited Conservator
          • (1)  Findings  22.34
          • (2)  Powers and Duties Must Be Specified  22.35
          • (3)  Forms: Order, Information Notice, and Letters  22.36
      • 4.  Modification of Powers Already Granted  22.37
      • 5.  Elder and Dependent Adult Civil Protective Order  22.37A
  • III.  SEPARATE PROCEEDING TO APPOINT LIMITED CONSERVATOR TO CONSENT TO STERILIZATION  22.38
    • A.  The Petition  22.39
    • B.  Appointment of Legal Counsel and Facilitator  22.40
    • C.  Notice Requirements  22.41
    • D.  Prehearing Examinations  22.42
    • E.  Regional Center Report  22.43
    • F.  The Hearing  22.44
    • G.  The Court Order  22.45
    • H.  Automatic Appeal of Order; Duration of Order  22.46
    • I.  Immunity From Civil or Criminal Liability  22.47
  • IV.  REVIEW OF LIMITED CONSERVATORSHIP; COURT INVESTIGATION AFTER APPOINTMENT  22.48
  • V.  REMOVAL OF LIMITED CONSERVATOR AND APPOINTMENT OF SUCCESSOR  22.49
  • VI.  TERMINATION OF LIMITED CONSERVATORSHIP  22.50
    • A.  Effect of Death of Joint Limited Conservator  22.51
    • B.  When Reevaluation of Conservatee by Regional Center May Be Required  22.52

23

Conservatorships for the Gravely Disabled Under the Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) Act

Vicki F. de Castro

Ann M. Hansen

Adrienne Sauro Heckman

Howard Serbin

  • I.  PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  LPS Act: An Overview  23.1
    • B.  Chart: Summary of LPS Act  23.2
    • C.  Definition of Gravely Disabled
      • 1.  Inability, as Result of Mental Health Disorder, to Provide for Basic Personal Needs  23.3
      • 2.  Evidence of Third Party Assistance Must Be Considered  23.4
      • 3.  Issue Is Whether LPS Conservatee Is Presently Gravely Disabled  23.5
    • D.  List of Local Conservatorship Agencies [Deleted]  23.6
    • E.  Representing Potential LPS Conservatee
      • 1.  Appointment of Counsel in LPS Proceedings  23.7
      • 2.  Ethical Considerations
        • a.  Rules of Professional Conduct  23.8
        • b.  Fulfilling Ethical Responsibilities in Practice  23.9
      • 3.  Need for Psychiatric Expertise  23.10
        • a.  Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders  23.11
        • b.  Medications  23.12
        • c.  Choosing Expert or Consultant  23.13
  • II.  DETENTION PERIODS UNDER LPS ACT
    • A.  72-Hour Hold
      • 1.  72-Hour Involuntary Detention of Adults
        • a.  Initiating the Hold  23.14
        • b.  Evaluation and Treatment  23.15
        • c.  Immunity  23.15A
      • 2.  Children’s Civil Commitment and Mental Health Treatment Act  23.16
    • B.  Additional 14-Day Intensive Treatment  23.17
      • 1.  Certification Review Hearing  23.18
      • 2.  Conduct of Review Hearing  23.19
        • a.  Evidence; Burden of Proof  23.20
        • b.  Required Findings  23.21
    • C.  Additional Periods of Intensive Treatment
      • 1.  Criteria for Additional Holds  23.22
      • 2.  180-Day Postcertification Treatment if Present Danger to Others
        • a.  Grounds  23.23
        • b.  Procedural Issues  23.24
  • III.  ADMINISTRATION OF ANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGS BEFORE LPS CONSERVATORSHIP
    • A.  Right of Involuntarily Detained Person With Capacity to Refuse Antipsychotic Drugs  23.25
    • B.  Riese Hearings to Determine Capacity to Refuse to Consent to Antipsychotic Drugs: Procedure  23.26
    • C.  Riese Hearings: Standards for Determining Capacity to Give Informed Consent  23.27
  • IV.  WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS BEFORE LPS CONSERVATORSHIP ESTABLISHED
    • A.  Initiating Writ  23.28
    • B.  Pleadings  23.29
    • C.  Form: Order Granting Writ of Habeas Corpus [Deleted]  23.30
    • D.  Form: Writ of Habeas Corpus [Deleted]  23.31
    • E.  Hearing and Order  23.32
  • V.  CREATION OF LPS CONSERVATORSHIP  23.33
    • A.  Situations in Which a Person May Become Subject to LPS Conservatorship  23.34
    • B.  LPS Follows Probate Code Procedures, With Certain Exceptions  23.35
    • C.  Prepetition Procedures
      • 1.  Initial Recommendation for LPS Conservatorship  23.36
        • a.  Time Limits for Determining Whether to Petition for LPS Conservatorship  23.37
        • b.  Additional 30-Day Intensive Treatment  23.37A
        • c.  Declaration (Affidavit) of Professional Person Making Recommendation  23.38
      • 2.  Conservatorship Investigation and Report  23.39
      • 3.  When the Conservatorship Investigator Recommends Against LPS Conservatorship  23.40
      • 4.  Contents of Comprehensive Report  23.41
        • a.  Designation of Conservator  23.42
        • b.  Consent of Proposed Conservator  23.43
        • c.  Recommendations Required on Powers and Duties of Conservator, Placement of Conservatee  23.44
        • d.  Bond  23.44A
    • D.  Petition for Appointment of Conservator and Temporary LPS Conservator and Related Papers  23.45
      • 1.  Responsibility for Preparation and Filing of Report and Petition  23.46
      • 2.  Confidentiality  23.47
      • 3.  Venue: County in Which Patient Resided Before Admission  23.48
      • 4.  Relationship of LPS and Probate Code Conservatorship Appointments
        • a.  LPS Conservator of the Person and Probate Conservator of the Estate  23.49
        • b.  Probate and LPS Conservators of the Person  23.50
    • E.  Temporary LPS Conservatorship
      • 1.  Who May Serve as Temporary Conservator  23.51
      • 2.  Notice  23.52
      • 3.  Bond and Letters  23.53
      • 4.  Powers and Duties of Temporary LPS Conservator  23.54
      • 5.  Statutory Writ of Habeas Corpus During Temporary Conservatorship  23.55
      • 6.  Duration  23.56
      • 7.  Termination  23.57
    • F.  Forms  23.58
      • 1.  Form: Ex Parte Petition for Appointment of Temporary LPS Conservator and Petition for Appointment of Conservator  23.59
      • 2.  Form: Order Appointing Temporary LPS Conservator  23.60
    • G.  Representing the Proposed LPS Conservatee  23.61
      • 1.  Role of Counsel for Proposed Conservatee After Petition’s Filing  23.62
      • 2.  Methods of Discovery
        • a.  Formal Procedures Apply  23.63
        • b.  Informal Discovery  23.64
          • (1)  Confidentiality Rules Limit Access to Certain Information  23.65
          • (2)  Conservatorship Investigator’s Report  23.66
          • (3)  Forensic Examination and Reports  23.67
          • (4)  Medical Charts Should Be Reviewed by Counsel  23.68
          • (5)  Diagnosis May Contain Additional Information  23.69
        • c.  Appointment of Defense Experts  23.70
      • 3.  Attorney Fees  23.71
    • H.  Notice of Hearing on Petition for Appointment  23.72
      • 1.  Judicial Council Form of Notice of Hearing May Be Used  23.73
      • 2.  Citation and Notice to Proposed Conservatee  23.74
    • I.  Proceedings on Petition for Appointment
      • 1.  Hearing or Trial
        • a.  Hearing Within 30 Days at Mutually Agreeable Location  23.75
        • b.  Advising Conservatee of Right to Trial  23.76
          • (1)  When Demand Must Be Made  23.76A
          • (2)  When Trial Must Begin  23.77
        • c.  Difference Between Hearing and Trial  23.78
        • d.  Attendance at Hearing or Trial
          • (1)  Proposed Conservatee Must Be Represented by Counsel  23.79
          • (2)  Who May Waive Proposed Conservatee’s Presence  23.79A
          • (3)  Physician’s Presence Can Be Waived  23.80
      • 2.  Standard and Burden of Proof That Person Is Gravely Disabled  23.81
      • 3.  Evidence That Person Is Gravely Disabled
        • a.  Presentation of Evidence  23.82
        • b.  Hearsay; Use of Court Investigator’s Report at Hearing and at Trial  23.83
        • c.  Historical Course of Disorder  23.84
        • d.  Evidence of Proposed Conservatee’s Anticipated Refusal to Accept Medication  23.85
        • e.  No Fifth Amendment Right to Refuse to Testify  23.86
      • 4.  Imposition of Legal Disabilities  23.87
      • 5.  Trial Procedures
        • a.  Criminal Procedure Rules Generally Inapplicable  23.88
        • b.  Issues for Jury Are Limited; Unanimity Required  23.89
        • c.  Jury Instructions  23.90
        • d.  Third Party Participation  23.90A
      • 6.  Relationship to Habeas Corpus Hearing  23.91
      • 7.  Court Order; Letters  23.92
      • 8.  Conservator’s Bond  23.93
      • 9.  Order for Appointment of Conservator
        • a.  Form: Order Appointing Conservator (No Contest)  23.94
        • b.  Form: Order Granting Petition to Appoint Conservator (After Court Trial)  23.95
      • 10.  Judicial Review
        • a.  Rehearing and Hearing  23.96
        • b.  Writ  23.97
        • c.  Rules on Appeal  23.98
  • VI.  POWERS, DUTIES, AND RIGHTS
    • A.  Overview
      • 1.  Powers and Duties of Conservator  23.99
      • 2.  Rights of Conservatee  23.100
    • B.  Postappointment Issues
      • 1.  Individualized Treatment Plan  23.101
      • 2.  Legality of Detention and Restrictions on Conservatee  23.102
      • 3.  Placement
        • a.  Conservator’s Power of Placement  23.103
        • b.  Priority Must Be Given to Suitable Facilities  23.104
        • c.  Power of Conservator to Return Conservatee to the Facility  23.105
        • d.  Power to Change Conservatee’s Placement
          • (1)  Transfer of a Conservatee—Generally  23.106
          • (2)  Transfer of a “Murphy” Conservatee  23.107
        • e.  Duty to Find Alternative Placement  23.108
        • f.  Right to Challenge Placement and Conditions of Confinement  23.109
      • 4.  Medical Treatment and Medications  23.110
        • a.  Conservatee’s Capacity to Consent  23.111
        • b.  Medical Procedures  23.112
          • (1)  Power of Conservator to Consent to Routine and Nonroutine Medical Procedures  23.113
          • (2)  Problem of Defining “Routine” Medical Procedures  23.113A
          • (3)  Procedure for Obtaining Court Order for Specific Medical Treatment  23.114
          • (4)  Form: Petition for Medical Treatment of Conservatee  23.115
          • (5)  Form: Order Authorizing Medical Treatment of Conservatee  23.116
        • c.  Psychosurgery  23.117
        • d.  Electroconvulsive Treatment (ECT)  23.118
          • (1)  If Conservatee Has Capacity to Give Informed Consent  23.119
          • (2)  If Conservatee Lacks Capacity to Give Informed Consent  23.120
            • (a)  Petition to Determine Capacity  23.121
            • (b)  The Hearing  23.122
            • (c)  Form: Petition to Determine Capacity to Consent to ECT  23.123
            • (d)  Form: Order Authorizing ECT  23.124
          • (3)  Statutory Terms of Consent  23.125
      • 5.  Statutory Rights of Mental Health Patients
        • a.  Rights Under Welf & I C §§5325–5325.2  23.126
        • b.  Denial or Limitation of Rights Under Welf & I C §§5325–5325.2  23.127
  • VII.  TERMINATION OF LPS CONSERVATORSHIP
    • A.  Probate Code Conservatorship Distinguished  23.128
    • B.  Automatic Termination
      • 1.  Termination 1 Year After Appointment  23.129
        • a.  Sixty-Day Notice of Termination Required  23.130
        • b.  Form: Notice of Termination of Conservatorship  23.131
        • c.  Termination of Placement Power; Holdover  23.132
      • 2.  Court Order Terminating Conservatorship; No Presumption of Incompetency  23.133
    • C.  Termination on Petition of Conservatee
      • 1.  Conservatee Entitled to Rehearing on Status  23.134
      • 2.  Form: Petition for Rehearing on Status  23.135
  • VIII.  REESTABLISHMENT OF LPS CONSERVATORSHIP
    • A.  Petition for Reappointment; Supporting Opinions; Notice  23.136
    • B.  Hearing on Petition for Reappointment of Conservator  23.137
    • C.  Ratification of Acts Beyond 1-Year Appointment  23.138
    • D.  Form: Petition for Ratification and Retroactive Reappointment of Conservator  23.139
    • E.  Form: Order Ratifying Acts and Retroactively Reappointing Conservator  23.140
  • IX.  RELATED PROCEEDINGS
    • A.  Community Treatment Facilities for Minors  23.141
    • B.  “Murphy” Conservatorships  23.142
    • C.  Assisted Outpatient Treatment Demonstration Project Act (“Laura’s Law”)  23.143
      • 1.  Criteria for Assisted Outpatient Treatment Services  23.144
      • 2.  Request and Investigation  23.145
      • 3.  Initial Petition  23.146
      • 4.  Patient Rights  23.147
      • 5.  Notice and Service  23.148
      • 6.  Written Treatment Plan  23.149
      • 7.  Hearing  23.150
      • 8.  Order  23.151
      • 9.  Involuntary Medication  23.152
      • 10.  Progress Reports and Hearings  23.153
      • 11.  Remedies for Noncompliance  23.154
      • 12.  Writ of Habeas Corpus  23.155
      • 13.  Renewal  23.156
      • 14.  Voluntary Services by Settlement  23.157
      • 15.  Mandatory Training  23.158

24

Appeals; Finality of Orders

Matthew P. Matiasevich

  • I.  INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS  24.1
  • II.  IDENTIFYING PROCEDURAL MECHANISM FOR CHALLENGING ORDER  24.2
  • III.  APPEALABLE ORDERS
    • A.  Generally Appealable Orders  24.3
    • B.  Generally Nonappealable Orders  24.4
  • IV.  ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR FIDUCIARIES  24.5
    • A.  Duty to Appeal  24.6
    • B.  Duty to Defend  24.7
    • C.  Potential Liability for Acting on Order Before It Is Final  24.8
  • V.  EFFECT OF PENDING APPEAL
    • A.  Automatic Stay of Enforcement  24.9
    • B.  Exceptions to Automatic Stay
      • 1.  Preventing Injury During Pendency of Appeal  24.10
      • 2.  Requiring Bond  24.11
      • 3.  Money Judgments or Orders Directing Payment of Money  24.12
    • C.  Effect of Conservatee’s Death  24.13
  • VI.  STANDARD OF REVIEW
    • A.  Importance in Appellate Process  24.14
    • B.  De Novo Review  24.15
    • C.  Substantial Evidence  24.16
    • D.  Mixed Questions of Law and Fact  24.17
    • E.  Abuse of Discretion  24.18
  • VII.  COMMON ISSUES IN CONSERVATORSHIP APPEALS  24.19
  • VIII.  OVERVIEW OF APPELLATE PROCEDURE
    • A.  Standing to Appeal  24.20
    • B.  Filing Timely Notice of Appeal  24.21
      • 1.  Form: Notice of Appeal  24.22
      • 2.  Filing Fees  24.23
      • 3.  Effect of Posttrial Motions  24.24
    • C.  Designating the Record  24.25
      • 1.  Form: Notice to Prepare Reporter’s Transcript  24.26
      • 2.  Form: Notice to Prepare Clerk’s Transcript  24.27
      • 3.  Form: Request for Correction of Transcript  24.28
      • 4.  Form: Notice of Election to Proceed by Appendix in Lieu of Clerk’s Transcript  24.29
      • 5.  Form: Stipulation Designating Contents of Joint Appendix  24.30
      • 6.  Form: Preliminary Stipulation on Attempt to Prepare Agreed Statement  24.31
    • D.  Briefs, Calendar Preference, and Oral Argument  24.32
    • E.  Resolution
      • 1.  Opinion and Remittitur  24.33
      • 2.  Petition for Rehearing  24.34
      • 3.  Petition for Review by Supreme Court  24.35
    • F.  Attorney Fees  24.36
    • G.  Costs  24.37
  • IX.  CONCLUSIVENESS OF ORDERS  24.38
  • X.  POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVES TO APPEAL FOR CHALLENGING ORDER  24.39
    • A.  Attacking Res Judicata Effect of Order  24.40
    • B.  Collateral Attack  24.41

CALIFORNIA CONSERVATORSHIP PRACTICE

(1st Edition)

May 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

File Name

Book Section

Title

CH02

Chapter 2

Court-Approved Substitutes for Probate Conservatorship

02-014

§2.14

Petition for Determination That Husband/Wife Lacks Capacity to Join in or Consent to Proposed Transaction and for Authorization to Execute and Fund Revocable Trust and to Make Federal Gift Tax Annual Exclusion Gifts

02-032

§2.32

Petition for Authority to Consent to Medical Treatment

02-036

§2.36

Order Authorizing Medical Treatment

02-042

§2.42

Petition for Authority to Remove Nonresident’s Property to Place of Residence

02-043

§2.43

Order Authorizing Removal of Nonresident’s Property to Place of Residence

02-049

§2.49

Petition for Order Setting Aside Absentee’s Personal Property to Absentee’s Family

02-050

§2.50

Order Setting Aside Absentee’s Personal Property to Absentee’s Family

CH03

Chapter 3

Jurisdiction, Venue, Transfer of Personal Property to Foreign Jurisdiction

03-017

§3.17

Petition to Transfer Proceedings to Another County (Prob C §2211)

03-019

§3.19

Objections to or Declarations in Support of Petition to Transfer Proceedings (Prob C §2215(a))

03-020

§3.20

Order Granting or Denying Transfer of Proceedings to Another County (Prob C §2215(b))

03-028

§3.28

Petition for Transfer of Personal Property to Another Jurisdiction (Prob C §2803)

03-030

§3.30

Verification by Declaration

03-034

§3.34

Order for Transfer of Personal Property to Another Jurisdiction (Prob C §2806)

CH04

Chapter 4

Notice

04-010

§4.10

Application for Order Authorizing Service by Publication: CCP §415.50

04-014

§4.14

Waiver of Notice

04-018

§4.18

Declaration (or Affidavit) of Service by Return Receipt Mail to Person Outside California: CCP §415.40

04-026

§4.26

Declaration (or Affidavit) of Service by Mail: Prob C §1261; CCP §1013a

04-034

§4.34

Application for Order Prescribing Notice

04-036

§4.36

Order Shortening Time

04-045

§4.45

Waiver of Special Notice

CH05

Chapter 5

Starting Conservatorship Proceedings

05-007

§5.7

Client Questionnaire

05-010

§5.10

Interview Checklist

05-021A

§5.21A

Request for Independent Powers

05-051

§5.51

Consent to Act as Conservator

05-088

§5.88

Objections to Petition for Appointment of Conservator

05-094

§5.94

Order Denying Petition to Appoint Conservator

05-100

§5.100

Affirmation Clause

05-105

§5.105

Sample Letter to Conservator of the Estate

05-110

§5.110

Sample Attachment (Item 5c(2))

CH06

Chapter 6

Temporary Conservatorships

06-043

§6.43

Final Account and Report of Temporary Conservator

06-044

§6.44

Order Settling Account

CH09

Chapter 9

Bonds

09-011

§9.11

Receipt of Personal Property and Agreement

09-013

§9.13

Allegation Concerning Deposit in Blocked Account

09-014

§9.14

Allegation Concerning Disbursements of Money From Deposited Property

09-016

§9.16

Attachment to Order Appointing Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) When Bond Reduced by Previously Deposited Assets

09-017

§9.17

Attachment to Order When Assets Yet to Be Deposited

09-018

§9.18

Order Permitting Withdrawals

09-020

§9.20

Petition for Reduction of Bond

09-022

§9.22

Order Reducing Bond

09-026

§9.26

Ex Parte Application to Increase Bond

09-027

§9.27

Ex Parte Order Increasing Bond

CH10

Chapter 10

First Steps of Administration, Marshaling Assets, and Inventory and Appraisal

10-023

§10.23

Petition for Examination of Person About Estate Property

10-028

§10.28

Petition for Authority to Institute Litigation Under Prob C §850, Retain Counsel, Enter Into Fee Agreement, and Pay Attorney

10-030

§10.30

Order Authorizing Conservator to Institute Litigation Under Prob C §850, Retain Counsel, Enter Into Fee Agreement, and Pay Attorney

10-045

§10.45

Sample Listing of Assets for Attachments to Inventory and Appraisal

CH11

Chapter 11

Issues of Legal Capacity of Conservatee

11-004

§11.4

Attachment 1l to Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310) (Power of Attorney)

11-005

§11.5

Attachment 29 to Order Appointing Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) (Power of Attorney)

11-019

§11.19

Petition for Order Broadening Capacity of Conservatee

11-020

§11.20

Order Broadening Capacity of Conservatee

11-028

§11.28

Petition for Order Determining Whether Conservatee Has Capacity to Marry or Enter Into Registered Domestic Partnership

11-029

§11.29

Order Determining Whether Conservatee Has Capacity to Marry or Enter Into Registered Domestic Partnership

11-035B

§11.35B

Attachment 1l to Petition for Appointment of Probate Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-310) (Personal Rights)

11-035C

§11.35C

Attachment 29 to Order Appointing Conservator (Judicial Council Form GC-340) (Personal Rights)

CH12

Chapter 12

General Responsibilities of Conservators

12-008

§12.8

Petition for Authority of Joint Conservator to Act

12-009

§12.9

Order Authorizing Joint Conservator to Act

CH13

Chapter 13

Duties and Powers of Conservators of the Person

13-036

§13.36

Petition to Authorize Conservator to Give Consent to Medical Treatment (Prob C §2357(b))

13-038

§13.38

Petition to Compel Conservator of Person to Consent to and Obtain Medical Treatment for Conservatee (Prob C §2357(i))

13-041

§13.41

Order Authorizing or Compelling Medical Treatment or Consent

13-056

§13.56

Petition

13-057

§13.57

Order

13-066

§13.66

Petition for Authority to Place Conservatee in a Locked Facility and/or to Consent to the Administration of Medications (Prob C §§2356.5(b)–(c), 2357)

13-067

§13.67

Order Authorizing Conservator to Place Conservatee in a Locked Facility and/or to Consent to the Administration of Medications (Prob C §§2356.5(b)–(c), 2357)

CH14

Chapter 14

Duties and Powers of Conservators of the Estate

14-026

§14.26

Petition for Authority to Expend Estate Money for Support and Maintenance

14-028

§14.28

Order Authorizing Conservator to Expend Estate Money for Support and Maintenance

14-033

§14.33

Petition for Order Directing Conservator to Furnish Support

14-034

§14.34

Order Directing Conservator to Furnish Support

14-036

§14.36

Petition for Order Directing Conservatee’s Support From Estate Despite Liability of Others

14-037

§14.37

Order Directing Conservatee’s Support From Estate Despite Liability of Others

14-042

§14.42

Petition for Authority to Pay Conservatee Allowance for Personal Use

14-043

§14.43

Order Authorizing Payment of Allowance to Conservatee for Personal Use

14-050

§14.50

Petition for Order Granting Independent Powers

14-052

§14.52

Order Granting Independent Powers to Conservator

14-054

§14.54

Petition for Withdrawal or Limitation of Independent Powers

14-056

§14.56

Order Withdrawing or Limiting Independent Powers

14-061

§14.61

Petition for Authority to Distribute Surplus Income to Relatives of Conservatee

14-063

§14.63

Order Authorizing Distribution of Surplus Income to Relatives of Conservatee

CH15

Chapter 15

Debts, Borrowing, Compromises, and Modifications of Obligations

15-013

§15.13

Petition for Order Directing Conservator to Pay Debt

15-015

§15.15

Order Directing Conservator to Pay Debt

15-023

§15.23

Petition for Instructions on Title to Certain Assets and on Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts and Expenses

15-024

§15.24

Order Instructing Conservator on Title to Certain Assets and Priority of Assets Used to Pay Debts and Expenses

15-034

§15.34

Petition for Order Authorizing and Directing Transfer of Property

15-035

§15.35

Order Authorizing and Directing Transfer of Property

15-043

§15.43

Petition for Authority to Borrow Funds

15-045

§15.45

Order Authorizing Conservator to Borrow Funds

15-051

§15.51

Petition to Extend, Renew, or Modify Obligation Owing to Conservatee or Estate

15-053

§15.53

Order Extending, Renewing, or Modifying Obligation Owing to Conservatee or Estate

CH16

Chapter 16

Investments, Deposits, and Insurance

16-004

§16.4

Petition for Authority to Invest Funds

16-005

§16.5

Order Authorizing Conservator to Invest Funds

CH17

Chapter 17

Sales and Real Property Transactions

17-035

§17.35

Petition for Authorization to Sell Conservatee’s Residence

17-036

§17.36

Order Authorizing Conservator to Sell Conservatee’s Residence

17-040

§17.40

Ex Parte Application for Authority to Grant Exclusive Right to Sell Real Property

17-041

§17.41

Ex Parte Order Authorizing Conservator to Grant Exclusive Right to Sell Real Property

17-055

§17.55

Conservator’s Deed Conveying Real Property

17-059

§17.59

Petition for Authority to Lease Real or Personal Property

17-061

§17.61

Order Authorizing Conservator to Lease Real or Personal Property

17-065

§17.65

Ex Parte Petition for Authority to Commence Partition Action

17-066

§17.66

Ex Parte Order Authorizing Partition of Real or Personal Property

17-068

§17.68

Petition for Authority to Execute Partition Agreement of Real or Personal Property

17-069

§17.69

Order Authorizing Execution of Partition Agreement of Real or Personal Property

17-072

§17.72

Petition for Authority to Accept Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure

17-073

§17.73

Order Authorizing Conservator to Accept Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure

17-076

§17.76

Petition for Authority to Dedicate or Convey Real Property

17-077

§17.77

Order Authorizing Conservator to Dedicate or Convey Real Property

17-082

§17.82

Petition for Authority to Exchange Property

17-083

§17.83

Order Authorizing Exchange of Property

CH18

Chapter 18

Substituted Judgment

18-022

§18.22

Petition for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers

18-024

§18.24

Order for Substituted Judgment to Make Donative Transfers

18-030

§18.30

Petition for Substituted Judgment to Create and Fund Revocable Trust and to Execute Pour-Over Will

18-032

§18.32

Proposed Revocable Trust Created Under Substituted Judgment

18-034

§18.34

Pour-Over Will

18-035

§18.35

Order for Substituted Judgment to Create and Fund Revocable Trust

18-039

§18.39

Petition to Establish and Fund Trust and to Appoint Trust Protector Pursuant to Settlement Agreement

18-040

§18.40

Proposed Revocable Trust Created Under Settlement Agreement

CH19

Chapter 19

Accounting

19-028

§19.28

Petition to Approve Conservator’s Account

19-038A

§19.38A

Sample Inventory and Appraisal and Supplemental Inventory Figures

19-039

§19.39

Sample Summary of Account

19-041

§19.41

Schedules PH(1) and PH(2): Assets on Hand at Beginning of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash

19-041A

§19.41A

Schedule AP: Additional Property Received During Period of Account

19-041B

§19.41B

Schedule A: Receipts During Period of Account

19-045

§19.45

Schedule A1: Return of Principal

19-046

§19.46

Schedule B: Gains on Sales

19-048

§19.48

Schedule C: Disbursements During Period of Account

19-054

§19.54

Schedule D: Losses on Sales

19-054A

§19.54A

Schedule DIST: Distributions to Conservatee

19-055

§19.55

Schedule E: Property on Hand at End of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash

19-058

§19.58

Schedule F: Changes in Form of Assets

19-060

§19.60

Schedule G: Liabilities at End of Account Period

19-061A

§19.61A

Schedule ____: Out-of-State Real Property

19-062B

§19.62B

Inventory and Appraisal Figures

19-062E

§19.62E

Schedules PH(1) and PH(2): Property on Hand at Beginning of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash

19-062H

§19.62H

Schedule A: Receipts

19-062J

§19.62J

Schedule C: Disbursements

19-062L

§19.62L

Schedule E: Property on Hand at End of Account Period: Cash and Non-Cash

19-072

§19.72

Order Settling Account and Report of Conservator, Allowing Fees

CH20

Chapter 20

Compensation

20-009

§20.9

Petition for Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees on Account

20-010

§20.10

Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees on Account

20-023

§20.23

Petition for Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees

20-024

§20.24

Order for Payment of Conservator’s Fees

20-029

§20.29

Sample Clauses for Attorney-Client Fee Agreement

20-036

§20.36

Petition for Order for Attorney Fees Under Prob C §1472

20-037

§20.37

Order to Pay Attorney Fees Under Prob C §1472

20-043

§20.43

Petition for Order to Pay Attorney Fees (Conservator’s Attorney)

20-044

§20.44

Order for Payment of Attorney Fees (Conservator’s Attorney)

CH21

Chapter 21

Conservatorship Termination

21-006

§21.6

Ex Parte Petition for Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship to Surviving or Remaining Conservator(s)

21-013

§21.13

Petition for Removal of Conservator, for Costs, Expenses, and Attorney Fees, and for Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship

21-017

§21.17

Order Removing Conservator, Awarding Costs, Expenses, and Attorney Fees, and Directing Issuance of Amended Letters of Conservatorship

21-020

§21.20

Ex Parte Petition for Order Suspending Conservator’s Powers, Appointing Temporary Conservator, and Directing Surrender of Estate

21-036

§21.36

Petition for Termination of Conservatorship

21-042

§21.42

Order on Termination of Conservatorship

21-056

§21.56

Final Account

21-059

§21.59

Order Settling Final Account, Allowing Fees, and Ordering Delivery of Assets

CH22

Chapter 22

Limited Conservatorships

22-008

§22.8

Authorization and Consent for Regional Center Assessment and Release of Information

22-020

§22.20

Attachment 1i to Petition

22-021

§22.21

Attachment 1j to Petition

CH23

Chapter 23

Conservatorships for the Gravely Disabled Under the Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) Act

23-059

§23.59

Ex Parte Petition for Appointment of Temporary LPS Conservator and Petition for Appointment of Conservator

23-060

§23.60

Order Appointing Temporary LPS Conservator

23-094

§23.94

Order Appointing Conservator (No Contest)

23-095

§23.95

Order Granting Petition to Appoint Conservator (After Court Trial)

23-115

§23.115

Petition for Medical Treatment of Conservatee

23-116

§23.116

Order Authorizing Medical Treatment of Conservatee

23-123

§23.123

Petition to Determine Capacity to Consent to ECT

23-124

§23.124

Order Authorizing ECT

23-131

§23.131

Notice of Termination of Conservatorship

23-135

§23.135

Petition for Rehearing on Status

23-139

§23.139

Petition for Ratification and Retroactive Reappointment of Conservator

23-140

§23.140

Order Ratifying Acts and Retroactively Reappointing Conservator

CH24

Chapter 24

Appeals; Finality of Orders

24-022

§24.22

Notice of Appeal

24-026

§24.26

Notice to Prepare Reporter’s Transcript

24-027

§24.27

Notice to Prepare Clerk’s Transcript

24-028

§24.28

Request for Correction of Transcript

24-029

§24.29

Notice of Election to Proceed by Appendix in Lieu of Clerk’s Transcript

24-030

§24.30

Stipulation Designating Contents of Joint Appendix

24-031

§24.31

Preliminary Stipulation on Attempt to Prepare Agreed Statement

 

Selected Developments

May 2019 Update

California revised the Rules of Professional Conduct appertaining to attorneys effective November 1, 2018. The new rules feature substantive changes as well as a new numbering system. This update conforms the citations to the new rules, and, where appropriate, retains the old rule for comparison. See chaps 1, 6, 7, 11, 20, and 23.

The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) changed the term “dementia” to “major neurocognitive disorder” and “minor neurocognitive disorder.” This change is reflected in this update and changes to Judicial Council forms.

The statutes and Rules of Court pertaining to electronic service of documents and pleadings were revised. Along with the addition of new sections and renumbering, additional requirements were added. See §4.29B.

The Judicial Council adopted new, mandatory forms for appointment of counsel for a conservatee or proposed conservatee. See §§7.5A–7.5B.

Concerns over hearsay and the admissibility of investigators’ reports in conservatorship hearings resulting from application of People v Sanchez (2016) 63 C4th 665, regarding violation of a plaintiff’s Sixth Amendment right to confront witnesses by introduction of hearsay introduced through expert testimony, are discussed in §23.83. See In re Ruedas (2018) 23 CA5th 777; J.H. v Superior Court (2018) 20 CA5th 530.

There were updates and changes to charts, checklists, and forms in chaps 5, 7 and 13.

California practitioners should be aware that the legislature enacted Fam C §297.5, effective January 1, 2005, which extended to California registered domestic partners the same rights, privileges, and obligations as spouses. The legislature also deleted Fam C §297(d)–(e), which placed domestic partners under a mutual duty of support for “basic living expenses” and specifically defined that term. However, several sections of the Probate Code relating to conservatorships still erroneously reference the Fam C §297(d) definition of “basic living expenses” when discussing domestic partners. Counsel should be aware of this, and recognize that the term domestic partner is synonymous with spouse in interpreting the code.

About the Authors

LEONARD THOMAS ADAMIAK is the supervising probate investigator for Los Angeles County. Tom, as he is known to all, was born and raised in Los Angeles. He received his B.A. in sociology in 1969 from California State University, Northridge. He worked for the Department of Social Services from 1970–1989 as a case worker, administrative assistant, fraud investigator, and supervising fraud investigator. He transferred to the L.A. County Superior Court in 1990. He completed thousands of conservatorship and guardianship investigations before attaining his current position in 2003. He currently supervises a staff of ten full-time investigators, one part-time investigator, and seven office assistants.

DEE DEE BLACKWOOD received her B.A. in sociology in 1974 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has been a probate investigator for the Superior Court in San Luis Obispo County since 1988, completing investigations in conservatorship, guardianship, and step-parent adoption matters. Her previous work experience was as a social worker in the areas of child protective services, adult protective services, and foster care licensing for San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties. She is a member of CASCI, California Association of Superior Court Investigators, has served on its board and numerous committees, and was chair of the Guardianship Task Force for many years. As chair during 2004, she was responsible for oversight of an extensive revision of the Court Investigator Guardianship Training Manual. She has also been a presenter at the Family Dispute Resolution Statewide Educational Institute and at CASCI conferences.

ALEX R. BORDEN established the Borden Law Office in Torrance and specializes in conservatorship, estate and trust administration, and litigation. Mr. Borden received his B.A. in economics with a business emphasis (cum laude) in 1991 from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and his J.D. in 1995 from Loyola University School of Law. Mr. Borden serves on and actively participates in the Los Angeles Superior Court Probate Volunteer Panel and Pro Per Guardianship Program of the South Bay Bar Association Estates and Trusts section and regularly serves as a court-appointed personal representative in decedents’ estates proceedings.

SUSANNE B. COHEN is an attorney in private practice in Berkeley specializing in conservatorships and trust administration, elder financial abuse litigation, long-term care and estate planning, and probate litigation. She received her B.A. from Vassar College and her J.D. from Loyola University School of Law. A former legal services attorney specializing in aging and disability issues, she has served as a staff attorney at Legal Assistance for Seniors in Oakland, California Rural Legal Assistance in Modesto, and The Arizona Center for Disability Law.

VICKI F. DE CASTRO is a Deputy County Counsel in Stanislaus County handling all probate, probate conservatorship, and mental health (including LPS) matters for the county. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her J.D. from Armstrong College. From 1978 to 1998 she had a private practice with emphasis in probate, estate planning, and conservatorships. Her primary clients were private professional conservators. For 13 years she conducted mental health certification review hearings and medication hearings as a hearing officer for Alameda County. During that time she conducted trainings for new hearing officers and medical staff. She has been a speaker for county counsel association probate and mental health study group conferences and for CALPSHO, the mental health hearing officer organization.

LINDA S. DURSTON is an attorney in private practice in Berkeley. Her major practice areas are estate planning, conservatorships, guardianships, and special needs trusts. She formerly practiced Social Security disability law at a not-for-profit agency in Northern California. She is a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, the Contra Costa County Bar Association, and the Alameda County Bar Association. She is past secretary of the California National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. She is principal author with Linda G. Mills of The Rhetoric, Politics, and Therapeutics of Opening Statements in Social Security Disability Hearings, 8 Yale J on Law and Feminism, 119–144 (no. 1, 1996). She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, where she received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in rhetoric and where she also taught for many years before entering the legal profession.

MICHAEL J. GILL received his B.A. in 1966 from the University of Redlands and his J.D. in 1969 from Loyola University School of Law. Mr. Gill is a partner in the Los Angeles firm of Saver & Gill, LLP. He has practiced probate, estate, trust, and conservatorship law for the past 35 years, representing many individuals, private professional conservators, and corporate fiduciaries. He is a Probate Court Mediator, a former officer of both Los Angeles and Orange County Estate and Trust Sections, former member of the Executive Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Trust and Estate Section, and a former CEB lecturer. He has also served as a delegate to the State Bar Convention and was member of the Los Angeles County Resolutions Committee.

DON EDWARD GREEN received his B.A. in 1973 from California State University, Long Beach, and his J.D. in 1976 and LL.M. (Taxation) in 1983 from McGeorge Law School. He retired in 2010, having served as the Probate Commissioner, Contra Costa Superior Court, and formerly having served as probate staff attorney, Sacramento Superior Courts, from 1989 to 1998. Before working for the court, Mr. Green practiced law as a certified specialist in estate planning, trust, and probate law (suspended while serving as a judicial officer). He is a former chair of the California State Bar Trusts and Estates Section, served as an Executive Committee member for 10 years, and served as Judicial Liaison to that section. He also served as a member of the Judicial Council of California Probate and Mental Health Advisory Committee. Mr. Green is a frequent lecturer and speaker for CEB, PLI, CJER, sections of the State Bar of California, county bar associations, and various community groups and charities. He was named Pro Bono Judge of the Year 2003 by the Contra Costa County Bar Association.

MARGARET M. HAND is an attorney in private practice in Oakland, specializing in estate planning, probate and trust administration, conservatorships and guardianships, and estate-related litigation. She received her B.A. (with honors) in 1989 from the University of California, San Diego, and her J.D. in 1993 from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. A certified specialist in estate planning, trust and probate law, Ms. Hand is a member of the Executive Committee of the Trust and Estates Section of the State Bar of California. She is immediate past chair of the Estate Planning, Trust & Probate Law Advisory Commission to the Board of Specialization of the California State Bar. She is a past chair of the Trust Committee of the Alameda County Bar Association Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law Section. Ms. Hand is a frequent panelist for CEB estate planning programs.

ANN M. HANSEN is a Deputy County Counsel in Alameda County. Ms. Hansen represents the Alameda County Public Guardian in LPS and Probate Conservatorship proceedings and related elder abuse litigation. Ms. Hansen received her B.A. (1st Class) in 1977 from the University of British Columbia and her J.D. in 1980 from Northeastern University School of Law. She is an active member of the Alameda County Bar Association Trusts and Estates Section.

ADRIENNE SAURO HECKMAN is a Senior Deputy County Counsel for the County of Orange. She received her B.A. from the College of Wooster, Ohio, and her J.D. from Case Western Reserve School of Law. Since 1986, she has represented the Public Guardian in LPS matters, and since 1990, has also represented and advised the Public Guardian and Public Administrator in probate conservatorships, decedents’ estates, trusts, guardianships, and related litigation. She is a member of the Orange County Bar Association Elder Law and Estate Planning and Probate sections and was chair of the latter section in 2000. She has lectured on a wide variety of conservatorship and estate issues for CEB, the Orange County Bar Association, the County Counsel’s Association LPS/Probate Study Section, the Orange County Fiduciary Abuse Specialist Team, the Orange County Designated Facilities, and state and regional Public Administrator/Guardian/Conservator’s conferences.

NEIL F. HORTON is a partner at Horton & Roberts LLP in Oakland. He limits his practice to litigation and mediation involving trusts and estates, estate planning, and trust and probate administration. Mr. Horton received his B.A. in 1958 from Grinnell College and his LL.B. in 1961 from Harvard Law School. He is a certified specialist in probate, estate planning and trust law (State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization), a member of the Executive Committee of the Trusts & Estates Section of the State Bar of California, and a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. A past president of the Alameda County Bar Association, Mr. Horton chaired the Executive Committee of its Trusts & Estates Section in 2004–2005.

SAMUEL D. INGHAM III has a private practice in Beverly Hills limited to conservatorship, guardianship, and trust and probate matters. Mr. Ingham received his B.A. in Latin (summa cum laude) in 1972 from the University of California, Irvine, and his J.D. in 1975 from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law. He is a certified specialist in probate, estate planning and trust law (State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization) and has served on the Executive Committees of the Los Angeles County Bar Association sections on Trusts and Estates and Natural Resource Law. He participates actively in the Los Angeles Superior Court Probate Volunteer Panel and Probate Mediation Panel and regularly serves as a court-appointed referee or special master in litigated cases.

POLLY LEVIN is an associate with the Bohne Law Group, with offices in Walnut Creek. Her practice focuses on providing planning services for persons with disabilities and their family members. This encompasses estate planning, including special needs trusts, trust administration, and conservatorships. Ms. Levin also works with personal injury attorneys to establish special needs trusts for their minor or disabled clients. Ms. Levin received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her J.D. from Golden Gate University School of Law. She is a member of the California and New York bars, the Alameda County Bar Association, Wealth Counsel LLC, and the Northern California Planned Giving Council.

PATINA A. MADISON (Tina) graduated from California State University, Long Beach, in 1973 with a degree in psychology. While working toward a master’s degree in special education, she joined the California Probate Referee’s office in Long Beach. She received certification as a paralegal in 1982, having completed the paralegal studies program at the University of California, Irvine. Ms. Madison graduated in 1991 from Western State College of Law with an emphasis in taxation. Since her admission to the Bar she has been a sole practitioner, limiting her practice to probate, conservatorship, and estate planning matters. She has served as a Judge Pro Tem in the Probate Department of the Orange County Superior Court, lectured for CEB, and acted as an expert witness.

BETTIE BAKER MARSHALL has her own practice in Campbell (Santa Clara County), limited to conservatorship, elder law, estate planning, and probate. Ms. Marshall received her B.A. in 1985 from University of San Francisco and her J.D. (cum laude) in 1991 from Santa Clara University School of Law. She has lectured and written on elder law and conservatorships for fiduciary, legal, and civic organizations, is certified as a specialist by the California Board of Legal Specialization in estate planning, trust and probate law, and has been named as a top elder law attorney by San Jose Magazine for 6 years and as Northern California Super Lawyer in Elder Law by Law & Politics Magazine, Publishers of San Francisco Magazine, for 3 years. She is a court-appointed counsel for proposed conservatees, is a member of the executive committee of, and Newsletter Editor of, the Silicon Valley Bar Association, Trusts & Estates Section, and is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell.

MATTHEW P. MATIASEVICH practices in San Francisco, specializing in trust and estate litigation. He received his B.A. from Stanford University in 1989 and his J.D. from the University of California, Davis, School of Law in 1993. He joined Evans, Latham & Campisi in 1997 and became a shareholder in 2003. His reported cases include Conservatorship of Coombs (1998) 67 CA4th 1395.

WILLIAM MINGRAM is a principal with Bond Services of California, LLC. Mr. Mingram received a B.S. in Quantitative Economics and Decision Sciences from the University of California, San Diego. He began his career at Van Bokkelen Bonds & Insurance Agency and he established its Southern California office before partnering with Bond Services of California, LLC.

KATHRYN M. MURPHY has a private practice with offices in Berkeley and San Francisco. Her practice is limited to estate planning, estate and trust administration, conservatorships, and litigation involving estates, trusts, and conservatorships. She is a certified specialist in probate, estate planning and trust law (State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization). She received her B.A. (philosophy) from the University of San Francisco, her LL.B. from Lincoln University Law School, her M.S. (taxation) from Golden Gate University, and her M.S.W. (mental health) from California State University, Sacramento.

E. JOAN NELMS is in private practice in Redlands and limits her practice to conservatorship, guardianship, trust and probate matters, probate litigation, and elder law litigation. Ms. Nelms received her J.D. in 1989 from Western State University, Fullerton, and is a certified specialist in probate, estate planning and trust law (State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization). Prior to employment with Brown, White & Newhouse, Ms. Nelms was employed by San Bernardino County as a research attorney for the Probate Department and has taught elder law classes at University of California, Riverside, Extension. Ms. Nelms regularly serves as a court-appointed attorney for Riverside and San Bernardino counties on conservatorship and guardianship matters.

RUTH A. PHELPS received her undergraduate degree in mathematics from Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles. She received her J.D. in 1975 and her LL.M. (taxation) in 2004 from Loyola University School of Law. Mrs. Phelps is a certified elder law attorney and a certified estate planning, trust and probate specialist. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, a member of the Executive Committee of the Trust and Estates Section of the State Bar of California, past President of the Southern California Chapter of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and a member of the Board of Overseers of Loyola University School of Law. She is a member of the adjunct faculty of Loyola University School of Law, teaching elder law. Mrs. Phelps serves as a member of the Probate Volunteer Panel of attorneys for the Los Angeles Superior Court. Her practice areas include long-term disability and care issues, Medi-Cal and Medicare planning, conservatorships, and guardianships. She prepares trusts, special needs trusts, wills, powers of attorney for asset management, and advance health care directives.

HOWARD SERBIN is a Supervising Deputy in the Office of the Orange County Counsel, in charge of the Probate/Mental Health Section. Mr. Serbin received his B.A. in 1974 from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his J.D. in 1976 from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law. He has worked on probate matters since 1980 and has been lead attorney to the Public Administrator/Guardian and head of the Probate/Mental Health Section since 1991. Mr. Serbin has also served as lead attorney for the Orange County Counsel’s Juvenile Dependency Section. He is past chair of the Estate Planning and Trust Section of the Orange County Bar Association. Mr. Serbin has been a presenter at the California State Bar Association Annual Conference and at County Counsel Association Probate/Mental Health Conferences. He has served as judge pro tempore in Orange County Superior Court. He was instrumental in drafting Prob C §§7660(c) and 2920.5. Mr. Serbin currently serves on Orange County’s committee to revise the local procedures for capacity hearings.

PETER S. STERN is an attorney whose private practice in Palo Alto emphasizes estate planning, probate, and elder law. He received his J.D. in 1981 from Stanford University School of Law. He is a past chair of the executive committee of the Estate Planning, Probate, and Trust Section of the Santa Clara County Bar Association (1993) and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Bar Association (1992–1994). He is certified as a specialist in estate planning, trust and probate law by the California Board of Legal Specialization of the State Bar of California. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California and of the Silicon Valley Bar Association. He serves on the Probate and Mental Health Committee of the Judicial Council of California. Mr. Stern holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in history from Denison University and Princeton University. Prior to his work in law, he served as a member of the history departments at Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara. He has also served in the U.S. Department of State. His current practice deals with a broad spectrum of estate planning, conservatorships, probate, and elder law, including Medi-Cal planning and other legal assistance to families of persons suffering from incapacities. He has lectured on elder law, Medi-Cal planning, and special needs trusts for CEB, the Santa Clara County Bar Association, the National Business Institute, and California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform.

JULIE R. WOODS is the coauthor of chapter 1. She is the Research Attorney of the Probate Division of the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Contra Costa. Ms. Woods is a Certified Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust & Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. In private practice she focused on litigation and administration of estates, trusts, conservatorships, and elder abuse actions. Ms. Woods received B.A. degrees in English and Philosophy from the University of Southern California and her J.D. from the University of Notre Dame Law School. She has practiced throughout the State of California and has been recognized as one of the Top Women Lawyers in both Northern and Southern California.

About the 2019 Update Authors

LISA C. ALEXANDER, a partner with the firm of Jakle & Alexander, LLP in Santa Monica, is the update author of chapter 15 and a coauthor of chapter 20. Ms. Alexander received her B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her J.D. from the University of Southern California. She is an active member of the Trusts and Estates Section of the Beverly Hills Bar Association, having served on the Section’s Executive Board and as Chair of its Legislative Committee.

ALEXANDER T. BOWMAN is an update coauthor of chapter 18. He is a partner at Horton, West & Bowman LLP in Oakland. Mr. Bowman focuses his practice on counseling clients in diverse estate planning matters and representing clients in trust and probate administrations. He received his B.S. in Finance from San Diego State University. He earned his J.D. from John F. Kennedy School of Law.

SUSANNE B. COHEN is the update author of chapter 6. See the About the Authors section for her biography.

VICKI F. DE CASTRO is the update author of chapter 23. She serves as an on-call Mental Health Hearing Officer for two California counties, conducting mental health certification review hearings and medication hearings. She is a former Deputy County Counsel in Stanislaus County where she handled all probate, probate conservatorship, and mental health (including LPS) matters for the county. She received the “Recognition Award” from the statewide County Counsel Association for her participation in the successful negotiations with the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS). See the About the Authors section for her biography.

DAVID J. ELEFANT practices law in Walnut Creek and is an update coauthor of chapter 10. He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. Mr. Elefant is active in the Contra Costa County Bar Association and was one of the founding co-chairs of its Probate and Trusts Section. His practice emphasizes estate planning and trust and probate administration. Mr. Elefant serves as a California Probate Referee in Contra Costa County and is an instructor at JFK University in the School of Management, Paralegal and Legal Studies Program. Mr. Elefant is also the author of California Decedent Estate Practice, chap 13 (2d ed Cal CEB) and Handling a Probate (Cal CEB Action Guide).

OLIVER A. GREENWOOD is the principal of the Law Offices of Oliver Greenwood in Pleasant Hill, and is the update author of chapter 4. Mr. Greenwood received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his J.D. from Golden Gate University in San Francisco. He is a member of the Judicial Council’s Probate & Mental Health Advisory Committee and has contributed to California Guardianship Practice (Cal CEB) and California Powers of Attorney and Health Care Directives (Cal CEB). Mr. Greenwood’s areas of practice include conservatorships, guardianships, and estate planning. Mr. Greenwood’s previous work experience was as a dishwasher, a magician, and an enlisted infantryman in the United States Marine Corps—all of which aid him in his current practice.

AMY HARRINGTON is an attorney practicing law in San Francisco, and is an update coauthor of chapter 10. Ms. Harrington received her B.A. degrees in political science and sociology from the University of California, Davis, and her J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. She has lectured for the National Business Institute and is a member of the National Association of Elder Law Attorneys. Ms. Harrington specializes in probate, trusts, estates, and conservatorships. She was appointed as a California Probate Referee in 2006.

DUNCAN P. HROMADKA is an associate with the firm of Hromadka & Gaulke in Los Angeles. Mr. Hromadka is an update coauthor of chapters 13 and 21. He received his B.A. in 2004 from the University of Michigan and his J.D. in 2007 from Pepperdine University. Mr. Hromadka is an active member of the Trusts and Estates Section of the Los Angeles County Bar Association and currently serves on the section’s executive board. He focuses his practice on probate, conservatorship, and trust matters.

SAMUEL D. INGHAM III is the update author of chapters 2 and 7 and an update coauthor of chapter 9. His practice is now in downtown Los Angeles. See the About the Authors section for his biography.

MELISSA KARLSTEN is an update coauthor of chapter 3. She is licensed to practice law in the State of California and is a shareholder of the law firm of Aaron, Riechert, Carpol & Riffle, APC. Ms. Karlsten has been practicing in the area of probate, estate planning, and trust law since 2002. She received her B.A. in English (cum laude) from Santa Clara University and her J.D. (cum laude) from the University of San Francisco School of Law. She was a member of the McAuliffe Honor Society and served as the technical editor for the University of San Francisco Law Review. Ms. Karlsten served as the president of the San Mateo County Bar Association Barristers Section, the treasurer and chair of the San Mateo County Women Lawyers Section, and now serves on the Board of Directors for the San Mateo County Bar Association. She is a coauthor of the article, When Death and Divorce Collide, published in the Spring 2005 issue of the Trusts and Estates Quarterly.

PETER MACLAREN, the update author of chapter 8, currently provides probate-related research support for the San Mateo Superior Court. Mr. MacLaren received a B.S. in Accounting from the University of Idaho, was licensed as a CPA in Idaho, received an M.S. in Taxation from Golden Gate University, a J.D. from Golden Gate Law School, and is currently an attorney licensed with the State of California. Mr. MacLaren was formerly an adjunct law professor at Lincoln Law School of San Jose and is currently an adjunct professor at Skyline Community College in San Bruno.

BETTIE BAKER MARSHALL is the update author of chapter 12 and a coauthor of chapter 20. See the About the Authors section for her biography.

ALEXANDRA R. MARTIN is an update coauthor of chapter 3. She is licensed to practice law in the State of California and has been an associate attorney of the law firm of Aaron, Riechert, Carpol & Riffle, APC since 2015, practicing in the areas of probate, trust law, and family law. She received her B.A. in Political Science (cum laude) from Loyola Marymount University and her J.D. (cum laude) from the University of San Francisco School of Law. She was a member of the McAuliffe Honor Society and served as the Executive Director of the Moot Court Program for the University of San Francisco.

MATTHEW P. MATIASEVICH is the update author of chapter 24. See the About the Authors section for his biography.

WILLIAM MINGRAM is an update coauthor of chapter 9. See the About the Authors section for his biography.

DAVID OH is the update author of chapter 14 and is a Senior Wealth Strategist at Charles Schwab. He focuses his practice on assisting high-net-worth individuals in all aspects of gift, estate, and philanthropic planning. Mr. Oh is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust, and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. He regularly lectures on these topics for continuing legal education programs and contributes to publications by CEB and the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California. Mr. Oh received his B.A. in Legal Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his J.D. with an emphasis in taxation from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law and an LL.M. in Taxation from Boston University School of Law.

PETER S. STERN is the update author of chapters 11 and 19. See the About the Authors section for his biography.

ADAM L. STRELTZER practices in the Century City area of Los Angeles, and is the update author of chapter 17. He received his B.A. from San Diego State University and his J.D. from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law. Mr. Streltzer is a member of the Trust and Estates Sections of the Beverly Hills Bar Association and Los Angeles County Bar Association, a member of the Commercial Law League of America, and is a participant in the Los Angeles County Superior Court’s Probate Volunteer Panel (PVP) program. Mr. Streltzer’s practice focuses on litigation concerning the rights, duties, responsibilities, money, and property of the deceased, incompetent, spendthrift, and bankrupt.

SARAH TALEI, update coauthor of chapter 16, is a partner with Oldman, Cooley, Sallus, Birnberg & Coleman LLP in Encino. Ms. Talei graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Business Administration and obtained her J.D. from Whittier Law School, where she specialized in children’s rights. She was an extern at the Children’s Law Center and the Probate Department of the Los Angeles Superior Court. She has served as the Secretary and Treasurer on the Barrister Board of the Beverly Hills Bar Association and is a 2005 recipient of the Barristers Lawrence J. Blake Award for dedicated service. She is also a member of the Los Angeles County Bar Association, the San Fernando Valley Bar Association, and the Iranian Bar Association.

CAROLYN WEST is an update coauthor of chapter 18. She is a partner at Horton, West & Bowman LLP in Oakland. Ms. West advises and represents individuals and institutions in probate and trust matters, including trust administration, decedents’ estates, and conservatorships. She received her B.A. from St. Mary’s College and her J.D. from Golden Gate University School of Law.

JULIE R. WOODS is the update author of chapters 1 and 5. See the About the Authors section for her biography.

ERIC R. YAMAMOTO, of the Law Offices of Eric R. Yamamoto in West Los Angeles, is an update coauthor of chapters 13, 16, and 21. Mr. Yamamoto focuses his practice on probate, conservatorship, and trust matters. He received his B.S. from the University of Southern California and his J.D. from Loyola University School of Law. He belongs to the Trusts and Estates Section of the Santa Monica Bar Association, the Los Angeles County Bar Association, and the State Bar of California. He is a past co-chair of the Santa Monica Bar Association Probate, Trust and Estate Planning Section. Mr. Yamamoto has taught at the University of West Los Angeles School of Law and at UCLA Extension and has been a speaker at numerous seminars sponsored by the Los Angeles County Bar Association. He periodically acts as an interviewer for the California State Controller’s Advisory Probate Referee. Mr. Yamamoto speaks for CEB and is also the author of California Decedent Estate Practice, chap 9 (2d ed Cal CEB).

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