You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters

Complete Plans for Small and Mid-Size Estates

Create complete estate plans for middle- and lower-income clients using this essential guide.

Create complete estate plans for middle- and lower-income clients using this essential guide.

  • Use comprehensive questionnaire to gather client information
  • Understand planning devices and their limitations
  • Be aware of tax and ethical considerations, challenging family situations, and problem assets
  • Follow steps to implement the estate plan
  • Learn to plan for clients facing long-term care costs
  • Then, see how it’s done in complete plans for true-to-life hypothetical clients: unmarried person without children; unmarried person with minor children; young married couple with minor children; married couple with adult children
OnLAW ES94920

Web access for one user.

 

$ 330.00
Print ES32920

looseleaf, updated 12/18

  

$ 330.00
Add Forms CD to Print ES22923
$ 99.00

Create complete estate plans for middle- and lower-income clients using this essential guide.

  • Use comprehensive questionnaire to gather client information
  • Understand planning devices and their limitations
  • Be aware of tax and ethical considerations, challenging family situations, and problem assets
  • Follow steps to implement the estate plan
  • Learn to plan for clients facing long-term care costs
  • Then, see how it’s done in complete plans for true-to-life hypothetical clients: unmarried person without children; unmarried person with minor children; young married couple with minor children; married couple with adult children

1

Introduction

CEB Staff

  • I.  WHY THIS BOOK?  1.1
  • II.  WHAT IS A SMALL OR MID-SIZE ESTATE?  1.2
  • III.  OVERVIEW OF CONTENTS  1.3

2

Ethical Considerations

Lynn Searle

  • I.  IMPORTANCE OF ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Constant Concern for Estate Planners  2.1
    • B.  Attorney Is More Than Scrivener  2.2
  • II.  RULES OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
    • A.  Sources of Authority  2.3
    • B.  Consequences of Violating Rules
      • 1.  Discipline by State Bar  2.4
      • 2.  Civil Liability for Malpractice, Breach of Fiduciary Duty, and Fraud  2.5
      • 3.  Invalidating Client’s Estate Plan  2.6
  • III.  ATTORNEY’S DUTIES  2.7
    • A.  Duty of Loyalty  2.8
    • B.  Duty of Confidentiality
      • 1.  Duty to Maintain Client Confidences  2.9
      • 2.  Some Typical Problem Situations  2.10
      • 3.  Third Parties
        • a.  Agents  2.11
        • b.  Family Members  2.12
      • 4.  Multiple Representation
        • a.  Examples of When Issue Arises  2.13
        • b.  Client’s Decision Should Be Documented  2.14
      • 5.  IRS Demands for Information  2.15
    • C.  Duty to Avoid Conflicts of Interest  2.16
      • 1.  Difficulty of Avoiding Conflicts  2.17
      • 2.  Examples of Conflict Situations
        • a.  Concurrently Representing Multiple Parties  2.18
          • (1)  Spouses or Domestic Partners  2.19
          • (2)  Other Couples as Clients  2.20
        • b.  Individual Clients  2.21
        • c.  Representing Client With Interests Adverse to Former Client  2.22
      • 3.  Consequences of Representing Parties With Conflicting Interests  2.23
      • 4.  Avoiding Conflicts of Interest
        • a.  Identify Conflict  2.24
        • b.  Distinguish Potential and Actual Conflict  2.25
        • c.  Obtain Informed Written Consent  2.26
          • (1)  Make Required Disclosures  2.27
          • (2)  Waiver of Confidentiality in Joint Representation  2.28
          • (3)  Form: Consent to Dual Representation—Short Form  2.29
          • (4)  Form: Consent to Dual Representation—Long Form  2.30
        • d.  Treat Each Party in a Joint Representation as Client  2.31
        • e.  Withdraw From Representation  2.32
    • D.  Duty to Act Competently  2.33
      • 1.  Duty to Do Research  2.34
      • 2.  Duty to Consult or Refer Client to Specialist  2.35
        • a.  Selection of Specialist  2.36
        • b.  Division of Fees  2.37
    • E.  Duty to Nonclient
      • 1.  No Duty to Adverse Party or if Arm’s-Length Transaction  2.38
      • 2.  Theories of Duty to Nonclient  2.39
        • a.  Intended Beneficiary  2.40
        • b.  Foreseeable Third Party Reliance  2.41
  • IV.  REPRESENTING MENTALLY IMPAIRED CLIENT  2.42
    • A.  California Authority: Ethics Opinions  2.43
    • B.  ABA Model Rules  2.44
    • C.  Standards and Tests for Legal Capacity
      • 1.  Due Process in Competence Determinations Act  2.45
        • a.  Evidence to Support Finding of Unsound Mind or Incapacity  2.46
        • b.  Ability to Communicate Decision and Understand Its Consequences  2.47
        • c.  Capacity to Make Health Care Decisions  2.48
      • 2.  Specific Statutes Regarding Capacity  2.49
        • a.  Testamentary Capacity  2.50
        • b.  Capacity to Create a Trust  2.51
        • c.  Capacity to Contract, Convey, or Make Agency Appointments  2.52
      • 3.  Assessment of Client Capacity
        • a.  Attorney Evaluation  2.53
        • b.  Mental Status Assessment by Health Care Professional  2.54
      • 4.  Physical Incapacity Distinguished  2.55
  • V.  UNETHICAL OR INVALID DONATIVE TRANSFERS FROM CLIENT TO ATTORNEY  2.56
  • VI.  CIRCULAR 230  2.57
    • A.  Advising and Informing Clients
      • 1.  Regarding Tax Returns  2.58
      • 2.  Regarding Documents, Affidavits, and Other Papers  2.59
    • B.  Attorney Competence  2.60
    • C.  Written Advice on Federal Tax Matters  2.61
    • D.  When Reliance is Reasonable  2.61A
    • E.  Circular 230 Penalties  2.61B
  • VII.  ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP
    • A.  Identifying the Client  2.62
    • B.  Creation of Attorney-Client Relationship  2.63
    • C.  Scope of Representation
      • 1.  Importance of Defining Scope of Representation  2.64
      • 2.  Certificate of Independent Review to Qualify Transfer to Prohibited Transferee  2.65
      • 3.  Termination of Representation  2.66
    • D.  Special Issues in Representing an Elder
      • 1.  When Only the Elder Is the Client  2.67
        • a.  Family Participation  2.68
        • b.  Family Members as Agents or Advisers  2.69
        • c.  Form: Sample Paragraphs in Engagement Letter Confirming Family Member’s Role  2.70
        • d.  Payment of Attorney Fees  2.71
      • 2.  Representing a Family Member  2.72
      • 3.  Representing Family Member and Elder  2.73

3

Tax Considerations in Estate Planning

Sandy Kasten

  • I.  INTRODUCTION TO TAX PLANNING  3.1
  • II.  GIFT TAX PLANNING
    • A.  Role of Inter Vivos Gifts in Estate Planning  3.2
    • B.  Gift Planning Issues: An Overview
      • 1.  Gift Tax Exclusions and Deductions  3.3
      • 2.  Other Potential Tax Benefits of Inter Vivos Gifts  3.4
      • 3.  Possible Tax Disadvantages of Inter Vivos Gifts  3.5
      • 4.  Possible Nontax Dangers  3.6
    • C.  Transfers Subject to Gift Tax
      • 1.  Taxable Gift Defined  3.7
      • 2.  Warning: Unintended Gifts  3.8
        • a.  Below-Market-Rate Loans  3.9
        • b.  Joint Tenancies  3.10
      • 3.  Warning: Incomplete Gifts  3.11
    • D.  Valuation of Gifts  3.12
    • E.  Gift Tax Exclusions
      • 1.  Annual Exclusion  3.13
      • 2.  Lifetime Exclusion  3.14
      • 3.  Medical and Educational Payments  3.15
      • 4.  Gifts to Younger Generations, Minors, and Students  3.16
        • a.  Guardianship  3.17
        • b.  Uniform Gifts to Minors Act  3.18
        • c.  Crummey Trusts  3.19
        • d.  Qualified Tuition Plans and Coverdell ESAs  3.20
    • F.  Gift Tax Deductions  3.21
      • 1.  Gift Tax Marital Deduction
        • a.  Allowance of Deduction or Exclusion  3.22
        • b.  Terminable Interest Rule  3.23
      • 2.  Gift Tax Charitable Deduction  3.24
  • III.  ESTATE TAX PLANNING  3.25
    • A.  Imposition of Federal Estate Tax  3.26
    • B.  Portability of Estate Tax Exclusion  3.26A
    • C.  General Planning Considerations  3.27
    • D.  The Gross Estate
      • 1.  Definition of Gross Estate  3.28
      • 2.  Proceeds of Life Insurance  3.29
      • 3.  Powers of Appointment  3.30
      • 4.  Joint Interests  3.31
      • 5.  Lifetime Transfers With Retained Interests  3.32
      • 6.  Revocable Transfers  3.33
      • 7.  Gifts Made Within 3 Years Before Death  3.34
    • E.  Deductions From Gross Estate  3.35
      • 1.  Estate Tax Marital Deduction (IRC §2056)
        • a.  Qualifying for Marital Deduction  3.36
          • (1)  Outright Transfers  3.37
          • (2)  Transfers to Qualifying Trusts
            • (a)  Survivor’s Trust  3.38
            • (b)  Qualified Terminable Interest Property (QTIP) Trusts  3.39
            • (c)  Life Income/General Power of Appointment Trust  3.40
        • b.  Use of Bypass and Disclaimer Trusts in Marital Deduction Planning  3.41
          • (1)  Bypass Trust  3.42
          • (2)  Disclaimer Trust  3.43
          • (3)  Planning Issues Regarding Bypass and Disclaimer Trusts  3.44
        • c.  Effect of Uncertainty Under Current Tax Laws  3.45
      • 2.  Estate Tax Charitable Deduction (IRC §2055)
        • a.  Qualifying for Charitable Deduction  3.46
        • b.  Split-Interest Charitable Bequests  3.47
      • 3.  Other Deductions  3.48
    • F.  Credits Against Estate Tax  3.49
  • IV.  GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX
    • A.  Overview of GST Tax  3.50
    • B.  Expertise and Caution Required  3.51
    • C.  Key Elements of GST Tax  3.52
      • 1.  Identifying the GST Transferor and Transferee
        • a.  The Transferor  3.53
        • b.  The Transferee
          • (1)  Skip Persons and Nonskip Persons  3.54
          • (2)  Generation Assignments  3.55
      • 2.  Determining the Type of Taxable Event  3.56
      • 3.  Calculating the GST Tax and Allocating the GST Exemption  3.57
        • a.  GST Tax Exclusions  3.58
        • b.  Determining the Taxable Amount  3.59
        • c.  Maximum Estate Tax Rate  3.60
        • d.  Allocating the GST Exemption  3.61
          • (1)  Automatic Allocation Rules  3.62
          • (2)  ETIP Exception to General Rules  3.63
    • D.  GST Tax Planning Mistakes  3.64
  • V.  CALIFORNIA ESTATE TAX  3.65
  • VI.  FOREIGN DEATH TAXES  3.66
  • VII.  CALIFORNIA REAL PROPERTY TAX  3.67
    • A.  Proposition 13: The Foundation  3.68
    • B.  Definition of Change in Ownership  3.69
    • C.  Exclusions From Change in Ownership  3.70
      • 1.  Transfers Between Spouses and Registered Domestic Partners  3.71
      • 2.  Trust Transfers
        • a.  Revocable Trusts  3.72
        • b.  Irrevocable Trusts  3.73
        • c.  Newly Acquired Trust Property in Bypass Trust  3.74
      • 3.  Joint Tenancy Transfers  3.75
      • 4.  Transfers Between Parents and Children
        • a.  Limited Parent-Child Exclusion  3.76
        • b.  Nonprorata Allocation Trap  3.77
      • 5.  Transfers to Grandchildren  3.78
      • 6.  Transfer of Tenancy-in-Common Interest  3.79
      • 7.  Transfers Involving Legal Entities
        • a.  General Rules  3.80
        • b.  Spousal and Parent-Child Exclusions When Entities Involved  3.81
  • VIII.  INCOME TAX PLANNING
    • A.  Personal Income Tax  3.82
      • 1.  Capital Gains and Losses  3.83
        • a.  Ordinary or Capital Assets  3.84
        • b.  Long-Term and Short-Term Capital Gains or Losses  3.85
        • c.  Tax Treatment
          • (1)  Capital Gains  3.86
          • (2)  Capital Losses  3.87
        • d.  Income Tax Considerations in Funding and Allocation  3.88
      • 2.  Sale of Personal Residence  3.89
      • 3.  The “Kiddie Tax”  3.90
      • 4.  Charitable Deduction  3.91
      • 5.  Income in Respect of a Decedent  3.92
    • B.  Fiduciary Income Tax  3.93
      • 1.  Grantor Trusts  3.94
        • a.  Person Other Than Grantor Treated as Owner  3.95
        • b.  Support Obligations  3.96
      • 2.  Estates and Nongrantor Trusts  3.97
  • IX.  BASIS CONSIDERATIONS
    • A.  Introduction to Basis Considerations  3.98
    • B.  Basis Rules for Transfers at Death  3.99
      • 1.  Property of Surviving Spouse or Domestic Partner  3.100
      • 2.  Exceptions to Basis Adjustment Rule  3.101
        • a.  Income in Respect of Decedent (IRD)  3.102
        • b.  Appreciated Property Acquired by Gift  3.103
      • 3.  Application of Basis Rule to Particular Forms of Ownership  3.104
      • 4.  Problems and Planning Considerations  3.105
    • C.  Basis Rules for Transfers During Lifetime
      • 1.  Donee’s Basis Same as Donor’s Adjusted Basis  3.106
      • 2.  Gift Planning Considerations  3.107
    • D.  Basis Rules for Estates of Decedents Dying in 2010 and Electing Out of Estate Tax  3.108
  • X.  IRC TAX RETURN PREPARER PENALTIES  3.109

4

Difficult Family Situations

Monica Dell’Osso

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  4.1
  • II.  UNMARRIED CLIENT
    • A.  Family Status  4.2
    • B.  Identification of Beneficiaries  4.3
    • C.  Selection of Fiduciaries  4.4
  • III.  MARRIED CLIENT
    • A.  No Prior Marriages  4.5
    • B.  Blended Family  4.6
      • 1.  Conflicts of Interest  4.7
      • 2.  Characterization of Property  4.8
      • 3.  Identification of Beneficiaries
        • a.  Description of Problem  4.9
        • b.  Bypass Trust
          • (1)  General Considerations  4.10
          • (2)  Disadvantages  4.11
      • 4.  Selection of Fiduciaries
        • a.  Overview  4.12
        • b.  Trustee  4.13
        • c.  Agent Under Durable Power of Attorney for Asset Management  4.14
        • d.  Agent Under Advance Health Care Directive  4.15
  • IV.  DOMESTIC PARTNERS AND SAME-SEX MARRIED COUPLES
    • A.  Creation of Domestic Partnership  4.16
    • B.  Status of Same-Sex Marriage  4.16A
    • C.  Estate Planning Issues
      • 1.  General Considerations  4.17
      • 2.  Conflicts of Interest  4.18
      • 3.  Tax Issues  4.19
  • V.  UNMARRIED COUPLE
    • A.  General Considerations  4.20
    • B.  Conflicts of Interest  4.21
    • C.  Property Ownership  4.22
    • D.  Cohabitation Agreement  4.23
  • VI.  CHILDREN
    • A.  Overview  4.24
    • B.  Adult Children  4.25
    • C.  Minor Children
      • 1.  Custodianship  4.26
      • 2.  Trust  4.27
      • 3.  Guardianship  4.28
      • 4.  Selection of Fiduciaries
        • a.  Overview  4.29
        • b.  Nomination of Guardian  4.30
          • (1)  Guardian of Person  4.31
          • (2)  Guardian of Estate  4.32
        • c.  Trustee and Custodian  4.33
    • D.  Problem Children
      • 1.  Nature of the Problem  4.34
      • 2.  Solution  4.35
      • 3.  Selection of Fiduciaries  4.36

5

Problem Assets

Richard A. Burger

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  5.1
  • II.  OUT-OF-STATE REAL PROPERTY  5.2
    • A.  Foreign State Estate and Inheritance Taxes  5.3
    • B.  Estate Planning Options and Problems  5.4
    • C.  Importance of Tax Apportionment Clause  5.5
    • D.  Foreign State Rules Affect Real Property Transfers  5.6
    • E.  Conclusion  5.7
  • III.  VACATION HOMES
    • A.  Nontax Issues  5.8
    • B.  Estate Planning Issues  5.9
      • 1.  Direct Transfer to Family Members  5.10
      • 2.  Planning Using QPRT, Family Limited Partnership, or LLC  5.11
      • 3.  Potential Problems  5.12
    • C.  Conclusion  5.13
  • IV.  FAMILY BUSINESSES  5.14
    • A.  Buy-Sell Agreement  5.15
    • B.  Corporate Restructuring  5.16
      • 1.  Lifetime Transfers: Gift Tax Considerations  5.17
      • 2.  Planning for Payment of Estate Taxes  5.18
    • C.  Conclusion  5.19
  • V.  FAMILY BUSINESS ENTITIES  5.20
    • A.  Hypothetical Example  5.21
    • B.  The Benefits: Valuation Discounts, Retention of Control, and Asset Protection  5.22
    • C.  The Risk: IRS Attack on Valuation Discounts  5.23
    • D.  Importance of Change of Ownership Rules  5.24
    • E.  Conclusion  5.25
  • VI.  S CORPORATION STOCK  5.26
    • A.  Eligibility Requirements  5.27
    • B.  Consequences of Violating S Corporation Rules  5.28
    • C.  Conclusion  5.29
  • VII.  FARMS, RANCHES, AND VINEYARDS  5.30
    • A.  Nontax Issues  5.31
    • B.  Estate Tax Issues  5.32
      • 1.  Estate Tax Reduction Under IRC §2032A  5.33
        • a.  Technical Requirements for Qualifying  5.34
        • b.  Careful Advance Planning Is Necessary  5.35
      • 2.  Estate Tax Deferral Under IRC §6166
        • a.  Rules for Qualifying  5.36
        • b.  Careful Advance Planning Is Necessary  5.37
      • 3.  Qualified Conservation Easement  5.38
    • C.  Conclusion  5.39
  • VIII.  COMPENSATORY STOCK OPTIONS  5.40
    • A.  Incentive Stock Options (ISOs)  5.41
    • B.  Nonqualified Stock Options (NQSOs)  5.42
    • C.  Conclusion  5.43
  • IX.  RESTRICTED SECURITIES  5.44
    • A.  Complex Governing Law  5.45
    • B.  Conclusion  5.46
  • X.  PROFESSIONAL CORPORATIONS  5.47
  • XI.  LAW PRACTICE  5.48
  • XII.  COPYRIGHTS AND PATENTS
    • A.  Copyrights  5.49
      • 1.  Transfer Rights  5.50
      • 2.  Termination Rights  5.51
      • 3.  Estate Planning Issues  5.52
    • B.  Patents  5.53
    • C.  Conclusion  5.54
  • XIII.  DIGITAL ASSETS
    • A.  Executor’s Power Over Digital Assets  5.55
    • B.  Form: Power Over Digital Assets  5.56
  • XIV.  WORKS OF ART AND OTHER COLLECTIBLES  5.57

6

Problematic Situations

Susanne B. Cohen

Robert L. Harrison

Kevin Urbatsch

  • I.  INTERNATIONAL AND NONCITIZEN TRANSACTIONS  6.1
    • A.  Noncitizen Clients
      • 1.  Definitions of Resident and Nonresident  6.2
      • 2.  Estate and Gift Tax Rules  6.3
      • 3.  Warnings  6.4
    • B.  Dual Citizen and Nonresident Citizen Clients  6.5
    • C.  Transfers to Noncitizen Spouse  6.6
      • 1.  No Standard Estate Tax Marital Deduction  6.7
      • 2.  Modified Estate Tax Marital Deduction for Transfers to QDOTs  6.8
      • 3.  Annual Gift Tax Exclusion in Lieu of Marital Deduction  6.9
      • 4.  Warnings  6.10
    • D.  Foreign Gifts or Bequests  6.11
    • E.  Foreign Trusts  6.12
      • 1.  Definition of Foreign Trust  6.13
      • 2.  Reporting Transfers  6.14
    • F.  Foreign Assets
      • 1.  Compliance With Foreign Estate Planning Laws  6.15
      • 2.  Tax Issues  6.16
      • 3.  Warnings  6.17
  • II.  LARGE RETIREMENT PLANS  6.18
    • A.  Importance of Beneficiary Designation  6.19
    • B.  Tax Treatment
      • 1.  Both Estate Tax and Income Tax Imposed  6.20
      • 2.  Determining Postdeath Minimum Distribution Rules  6.21
        • a.  Distribution to Surviving Spouse  6.22
        • b.  Distribution to Nonspouse Beneficiary
          • (1)  Rollovers Allowed  6.23
          • (2)  Distribution Rules  6.24
      • 3.  Warnings
        • a.  General Considerations  6.25
        • b.  Considerations for Married Couples  6.26
  • III.  INTERESTS IN TRUSTS CREATED BY OTHERS  6.27
    • A.  Powers of Appointment  6.28
    • B.  Transfer Tax Effects of Powers of Appointment  6.29
    • C.  Warning  6.30
  • IV.  VALUING PERSONAL PROPERTY  6.31
  • V.  REAL PROPERTY TAXATION ISSUES  6.32
  • VI.  GIFTS TO DRAFTERS, CARE CUSTODIANS, AND OTHER TRUSTED PERSONS
    • A.  Prohibited Transferees and Statutory Presumptions  6.33
    • B.  Exceptions to Statutory Presumptions; Certificate of Independent Review  6.33A
    • C.  Warnings
      • 1.  Donative Transfer to Care Custodian  6.34
      • 2.  Who Qualifies as Independent Attorney [Deleted]  6.34A
      • 3.  Donative Transfers to Attorney Who Drafts Documents  6.35
  • VII.  ESTATE PLANNING TO BENEFIT DISABLED PERSONS
    • A.  Challenges and Pitfalls  6.36
    • B.  Importance of Preserving Public Benefits by Use of Special Needs Trust  6.37
    • C.  SSI and Medi-Cal  6.38
      • 1.  Legal Authority Governing SSI and Medi-Cal  6.39
      • 2.  SSI
        • a.  Benefits  6.40
        • b.  Eligibility  6.41
          • (1)  Resource Limits  6.42
          • (2)  Limitation on Income  6.43
          • (3)  Reduction for In-Kind Support and Maintenance Provided  6.44
      • 3.  Medi-Cal
        • a.  Benefits  6.45
        • b.  Eligibility  6.46
      • 4.  SSI and Medi-Cal Distinguished From Social Security and Medicare  6.47
    • D.  Third Party Special Needs Trusts  6.48
      • 1.  Legal Authority  6.49
      • 2.  Introduction to Selected SNT Provisions
        • a.  Revocability  6.50
        • b.  Distribution Standard  6.51
        • c.  Management Team  6.52
          • (1)  Trustee  6.53
          • (2)  Trust Advisory Committee  6.54
          • (3)  Trust Protector  6.55
    • E.  Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Account  6.55A
  • VIII.  MEDI-CAL PLANNING  6.56
    • A.  Specialized Area of Practice
      • 1.  Applicable Law Difficult to Locate  6.57
      • 2.  Lack of Coherent Guidelines  6.58
      • 3.  Law Constantly in Flux  6.59
      • 4.  Warning  6.60
    • B.  Difficulty of Coordinating Estate Planning and Medi-Cal Planning  6.61
    • C.  Medi-Cal Planning Issues  6.62
      • 1.  Drafting for Possible Incapacity of the Client  6.63
      • 2.  Meeting Income and Asset Eligibility Guidelines  6.64
        • a.  Spending Down and Lifetime Transfers to Gain Eligibility  6.65
        • b.  The Residence  6.66
      • 3.  Eligibility Rules When One Spouse Needs Long-Term Nursing Home Care  6.67
      • 4.  Rules Regarding Annuities  6.68
      • 5.  Rules Regarding Trusts  6.69
      • 6.  Medi-Cal Estate Claims  6.70

6A

Estate Planning for Companion Animals and Pets

Elizabeth Anne Bird

  • I.  OBJECTIVES OF ESTATE PLANNING FOR COMPANION ANIMALS  6A.1
  • II.  USING A TRUST TO PROVIDE FOR COMPANION ANIMALS
    • A.  Statutory Authority and Requirements
      • 1.  Statutory Authority  6A.2
      • 2.  Statutory Requirements
        • a.  Distribution Requirements  6A.3
        • b.  Enforcement and Reporting Requirements  6A.4
    • B.  Advantages of Using a Trust  6A.5
    • C.  Preliminary Considerations
      • 1.  Limitations on Disposition of Companion Animals  6A.6
      • 2.  Assets to Fund Companion Animal Trust  6A.7
      • 3.  Trustee, Caregiver, and Trust Protector Duties and Fees  6A.8
      • 4.  Cost of Custom Drafting  6A.9
    • D.  Case Study: A Dog Named Sera  6A.10
  • III.  ALTERNATIVES TO COMPANION ANIMAL TRUST
    • A.  Outright Gift  6A.11
      • 1.  Form: Outright Gift in Will  6A.12
      • 2.  Form: Outright Gift in Trust Agreement  6A.13
    • B.  Animal Protection Organizations
      • 1.  Outright Gift to Animal Protection Organization  6A.14
      • 2.  Form: Outright Gift to Animal Protection Organization  6A.15
  • IV.  DRAFTING COMPANION ANIMAL TRUST PROVISIONS
    • A.  Roles of Caretaker, Trustee, and Trust Protector  6A.16
      • 1.  Form: Trustee Provisions  6A.17
      • 2.  Form: Appointment of Caretaker  6A.18
      • 3.  Form: Appointment of Trust Protector  6A.19
    • B.  Providing for Specific Companion Animals Versus Any Surviving Companion Animals  6A.20
      • 1.  Providing Specific Care Instructions  6A.21
      • 2.  Form: Instruction Not to Separate Companion Animals  6A.22
    • C.  Provisions for Settlor’s Incapacity  6A.23
      • 1.  Form: Care for Companion Animals in Case of Settlor’s Incapacity  6A.24
      • 2.  Funding Trust on Settlor’s Incapacity  6A.25
    • D.  Funding Companion Animal Trust  6A.26
      • 1.  Form: Specific Distribution to Companion Animal Trust  6A.27
      • 2.  Form: Distribution of Trust Residue to Companion Animal Trust  6A.28
    • E.  Expenses for Care of Companion Animal  6A.29
    • F.  Caretaker, Trustee, and Trust Protector Fees  6A.30
    • G.  Veterinarian Information
      • 1.  Including Information in Trust  6A.31
      • 2.  Form: Veterinarian Information  6A.32
    • H.  Distribution on Termination of Companion Animal Trust
      • 1.  Designating Remainder Beneficiary  6A.33
      • 2.  Form: Distribution of Residue to Charity  6A.34
    • I.  Tax Issues
      • 1.  Income Tax Consequences  6A.35
      • 2.  No Charitable Deduction  6A.36
      • 3.  Form: Remainder Gift Does Not Qualify for Charitable Deduction  6A.37
  • V.  CHECKLIST: CLIENT INTERVIEW  6A.38
  • VI.  FORM: EMERGENCY CONTACT  6A.39
  • VII.  TRUST PROVISIONS  6A.40
    • A.  Form: Provisions for Single Settlor’s Trust, With Provisions for Care of Companion Animals  6A.41
    • B.  Form: Provisions for Married Couple’s Trust, Revised to Provide for Care of Companion Animals  6A.42

7

Planning Devices and Issues: An Overview

Nancy D. Rasch

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  7.1
  • II.  MANAGING AND DISTRIBUTING ASSETS
    • A.  Wills  7.2
      • 1.  Advantages  7.3
      • 2.  Disadvantages  7.4
    • B.  Trusts  7.5
      • 1.  Revocable Trusts  7.6
        • a.  Advantages  7.7
        • b.  Disadvantages  7.8
      • 2.  Marital Trusts: The Marital Deduction  7.9
    • C.  Power of Attorney for Financial Management
      • 1.  Description  7.10
      • 2.  Planning Issues  7.11
    • D.  Nomination of Conservator of the Estate  7.11A
    • E.  Assets Transferred on Death By Operation of Law
      • 1.  Personal Property Accounts  7.12
      • 2.  Planning Issues  7.13
      • 3.  Real Property: Revocable Transfer on Death Deed  7.13A
      • 4.  Planning Issues  7.13B
    • F.  Assets With Designated Beneficiaries  7.14
      • 1.  Retirement Plans  7.15
        • a.  Spouse as Beneficiary  7.16
        • b.  Nonspouse Beneficiaries  7.17
        • c.  Minors as Beneficiaries  7.18
        • d.  Trust as Beneficiary  7.19
      • 2.  Roth IRAs  7.20
      • 3.  Life Insurance  7.21
    • G.  Joint Tenancy  7.22
      • 1.  Creating and Severing Joint Tenancy  7.23
      • 2.  Planning Issues
        • a.  Disadvantages  7.24
        • b.  When Severance May Be Advantageous
          • (1)  Distribution to Other Than Joint Tenant Desired  7.25
          • (2)  For Married Couples  7.26
    • H.  Community Property With Right of Survivorship  7.27
    • I.  Types of Property Governed by Will, Trust, or the Laws of Intestacy  7.28
      • 1.  Tenancy in Common  7.29
      • 2.  Community Property  7.30
  • III.  MINORS  7.31
    • A.  Care of the Minor’s Person
      • 1.  When Guardianship Not Required  7.32
        • a.  Form: Authorization for Care Provider to Consent to Medical or Dental Treatment of Minor (Fam C §6910)  7.33
        • b.  Form: Caregiver’s Authorization Affidavit (Fam C §6552)  7.34
      • 2.  Guardianship of the Person  7.35
    • B.  Care of the Minor’s Estate  7.36
      • 1.  Payment or Delivery to Parent  7.37
      • 2.  Form: Written Assurance of Parent (Prob C §3401(c)(2))  7.38
      • 3.  Court-Ordered Blocked Account  7.39
      • 4.  Transfer to Custodian Under California Uniform Transfers to Minors Act  7.40
        • a.  Advantages  7.41
        • b.  Planning Issues  7.42
      • 5.  Trust  7.43
      • 6.  Guardianship of the Estate  7.44
    • C.  Other Planning Possibilities
      • 1.  IRC §529 College Savings Accounts  7.45
        • a.  Basic Concepts  7.46
        • b.  Planning Issues  7.47
      • 2.  Coverdell Education Savings Accounts  7.48
      • 3.  Special Needs Trusts  7.49
  • IV.  ADVANCE HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES
    • A.  Importance of Advance Directive  7.50
    • B.  Advance Health Care Directives Under Health Care Decisions Law  7.51
    • C.  Agent Under Power of Attorney for Health Care
      • 1.  Authority to Make Health Care Decisions
        • a.  Scope of Authority  7.52
        • b.  Health Care Decisions by Someone Other Than Agent  7.53
      • 2.  Right to Receive Information  7.54
      • 3.  Postmortem Acts
        • a.  Authority to Dispose of Remains and Authorize an Autopsy  7.55
        • b.  Authority to Make Gifts Under the California Uniform Anatomical Gift Act  7.55A
      • 4.  Compensation  7.56
    • D.  Provisions in Advance Health Care Directives
      • 1.  Specific Statements of Wishes  7.57
        • a.  Withholding or Withdrawing Medical Treatment  7.58
        • b.  Other Specific Wishes  7.59
      • 2.  Limiting Court Enforcement of Agent’s Duties  7.60
  • V.  HEALTH CARE SURROGATES  7.61
  • VI.  DOCUMENTS RELATED TO ADVANCE HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES
    • A.  Request Regarding Resuscitative Measures
      • 1.  Forms of Request  7.62
      • 2.  Physician Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Form  7.62A
    • B.  Anatomical Gifts  7.63
  • VII.  NOMINATION OF CONSERVATOR OF THE PERSON  7.64

8

Gathering Client Information

Catherine Raye-Wong

  • I.  PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS  8.1
    • A.  Determining Title to Assets  8.2
    • B.  Obtaining Values of Assets  8.3
  • II.  SOURCES OF INFORMATION
    • A.  Real Property  8.4
    • B.  Nonretirement Financial Institution Accounts, Investment Accounts, and Stocks  8.5
    • C.  Businesses  8.6
    • D.  Retirement Assets  8.7
    • E.  Anticipated Assets  8.8
    • F.  Other Types of Assets  8.9
    • G.  Online Accounts and Passwords  8.9A
  • III.  FORM: CLIENT QUESTIONNAIRE  8.10
  • IV.  THE CLIENT INTERVIEW  8.11
    • A.  Names  8.12
    • B.  Marital or Partnership Status; Citizenship  8.13
    • C.  Intestate Heirs  8.14
    • D.  Children, Other Dependents, and Pets  8.15
    • E.  Predeceased Spouses  8.15A
    • F.  Fiduciary Information  8.16

9

Plan for Unmarried Person Without Children

Jerilyn Paik

Catherine Raye-Wong

  • I.  BEGINNING THE PROCESS  9.1
    • A.  Determining Title to Assets  9.2
    • B.  Obtaining Values of Assets  9.3
  • II.  THE HYPOTHETICAL: UNMARRIED PERSON WITHOUT CHILDREN
    • A.  The Client: Mary Smith  9.4
    • B.  Determining Client’s Goals and How to Achieve Them  9.5
    • C.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Asset Management and Distribution
      • 1.  Beneficiaries
        • a.  Mother  9.6
          • (1)  Plan With Will Without Testamentary Trust  9.7
            • (a)  Probate Considerations  9.8
              • (i)  Procedure  9.9
              • (ii)  Costs  9.10
            • (b)  Real Property Reassessment Considerations  9.11
        • b.  Nonprobate Transfers of Real Property  9.11A
          • (1)  Plan With Will That Includes Testamentary Trust  9.12
          • (2)  Plan With Revocable Trust and Pourover Will  9.13
        • c.  Siblings  9.14
        • d.  Minors  9.15
        • e.  Charitable Organizations  9.16
        • f.  Mary’s Decisions  9.17
        • g.  How the Plan Will Be Implemented  9.18
      • 2.  Who Will Control Mary’s Assets  9.19
        • a.  Determination of Incapacity  9.20
        • b.  Considerations in Selecting Fiduciaries
          • (1)  In General  9.21
          • (2)  Executors, Successor Trustees, and Agents  9.22
        • c.  Cofiduciaries  9.23
        • d.  Successor Trustee  9.24
        • e.  Agent Under Power of Attorney
          • (1)  Springing or Immediately Effective Durable Power of Attorney  9.25
          • (2)  Statutory Form Power of Attorney  9.26
          • (3)  Powers That Must Be Specifically Included  9.27
          • (4)  Personal Care Decision-Making Powers  9.28
          • (5)  Power Over Joint Tenancy Assets  9.29
        • f.  Conservator  9.30
        • g.  Executor of Will  9.31
        • h.  Mary’s Decisions  9.32
    • D.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Health Care Decisions  9.33
      • 1.  Statement of Wishes  9.34
      • 2.  Agent Under Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions  9.35
      • 3.  When the Power of Attorney Becomes Effective  9.36
      • 4.  Mary’s Decisions  9.37
  • III.  FORMS
    • A.  Form: Mary R. Smith Trust  9.38
    • B.  Form: Schedule A  9.39
    • C.  Form: Certification of the Mary R. Smith Trust  9.40
    • D.  Form: Will of Mary R. Smith  9.41
    • E.  Form: Financial Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney  9.42
    • F.  Advance Health Care Directive  9.43
    • G.  Form: Transmittal Letter to Client  9.44

10

Plan for Unmarried Person With Minor Children

Mary K. Vo

Donald L. Scoggins

Lynn Searle

  • I.  THE HYPOTHETICAL: UNMARRIED PERSON WITH MINOR CHILDREN
    • A.  The Client: Jane Johnson  10.1
    • B.  The Client’s Assets  10.2
    • C.  Determining Client’s Goals and How to Achieve Them  10.3
    • D.  Formulating the Estate Plan for the Minor Children
      • 1.  Custody
        • a.  Effect of Joint Custody  10.4
        • b.  Guardian of the Person  10.5
      • 2.  Guardian of the Estate  10.6
      • 3.  Jane’s Decisions  10.7
    • E.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Asset Management and Distribution
      • 1.  Beneficiaries
        • a.  The Children  10.8
        • b.  Contingent Beneficiaries  10.9
        • c.  Gifts From Grandparents  10.9A
      • 2.  Will With Testamentary Trust or Revocable Trust  10.10
      • 3.  Jane’s Decisions  10.11
        • a.  Trust Provisions While Jane Is Alive  10.12
        • b.  Trust Provisions at Jane’s Death  10.13
      • 4.  Division of Responsibilities  10.14
      • 5.  Who Will Control Jane’s Assets  10.15
        • a.  Choosing Successor Trustee, Agent, Executor, and Conservator  10.16
        • b.  Successor Trustee  10.17
        • c.  Agent Under Durable Power of Attorney  10.18
          • (1)  Springing or Immediately Effective Durable Power of Attorney  10.19
          • (2)  Personal Care Decision-Making Powers  10.20
        • d.  Conservator  10.21
        • e.  Executor of Will  10.22
        • f.  Jane’s Decisions  10.23
    • F.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Health Care Decisions  10.24
      • 1.  Statement of Wishes
        • a.  Life-Sustaining Treatment  10.25
        • b.  Organ Donation and Cremation  10.26
        • c.  Major Neurocognitive Disorder  10.27
      • 2.  Agent Under Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions  10.28
      • 3.  When Power of Attorney Becomes Effective  10.29
  • II.  FORMS  10.30
    • A.  Form: Nomination of Guardians  10.31
    • B.  Form: Jane Johnson Trust  10.32
    • C.  Form: Assignment to Trust  10.33
    • D.  Form: Pourover Will  10.34
    • E.  Form: Attorney-Drafted Durable Power of Attorney for Financial Management  10.35
    • F.  Form: Advance Health Care Directive  10.36
    • G.  Form: Transmittal Letter to Client  10.37

11

Plan for Young Married Couple With Minor Children

Sandra B. Price

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  11.1
  • II.  PLANNING FOR YOUNGER COUPLE WITH MINOR CHILDREN
    • A.  The Hypothetical Clients: Dan and Sue Young  11.2
    • B.  Determining Client’s Goals and How to Achieve Them  11.3
    • C.  Guardianship of the Person and Estate if Children Are Minors  11.4
    • D.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Asset Management and Distribution
      • 1.  Beneficiaries
        • a.  Spouse  11.5
          • (1)  Estate Tax Issues  11.6
          • (2)  Need for Additional Insurance  11.7
        • b.  Children: Planning Options to Consider  11.8
        • c.  Dan and Sue’s Decisions About Spouse and Children  11.9
        • d.  No Other Immediate Beneficiaries  11.9A
        • e.  Decisions About Contingent Beneficiaries  11.10
        • f.  Will or Revocable Trust: Dan and Sue’s Decision  11.11
      • 2.  How the Plan Will Be Implemented  11.12
      • 3.  Who Will Control Decisions About Dan and Sue’s Assets at Incapacity or Death  11.13
        • a.  While Either Spouse Is Alive
          • (1)  Each Has Control of Community Property  11.14
          • (2)  Durable Power of Attorney  11.15
            • (a)  Alternate Agents  11.16
            • (b)  Powers of Agent  11.17
            • (c)  Statutory Form or Attorney-Drafted Form  11.18
            • (d)  Consent of Agent; Advising Agent  11.18A
          • (3)  Personal Care Decisions  11.19
          • (4)  Nomination of Conservator  11.20
          • (5)  Dan and Sue’s Decisions  11.21
        • b.  At Death  11.22
    • E.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Health Care Decisions  11.23
      • 1.  Statement of Wishes  11.24
      • 2.  Agent Under Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions  11.25
      • 3.  Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST)  11.25A
  • III.  SAMPLE FORMS  11.26
    • A.  Form: Grant Deed  11.27
    • B.  Form: Will of Daniel Young  11.28
    • C.  Form: Will of Susan Young  11.29
    • D.  Form: Financial Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney  11.30
    • E.  Advance Health Care Directive and POLST  11.31
    • F.  Form: Transmittal Letter to Client  11.32

11A

Plan for Married Couple With Adult Children

Sandra B. Price

  • I.  INTRODUCTION  11A.1
  • II.  PLANNING FOR COUPLE WITH ADULT CHILDREN
    • A.  The Hypothetical Clients
      • 1.  The Family  11A.2
      • 2.  The Assets  11A.3
    • B.  Determining Client’ s Goals and How to Achieve Them  11A.4
    • C.  No Guardianship for Minors  11A.5
    • D.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Asset Management and Distribution
      • 1.  Beneficiaries; Choice of Documents
        • a.  Spouse  11A.6
          • (1)  Estate Tax Considerations; Disclaimer; Portability  11A.7
          • (2)  Life Insurance Needs  11A.8
          • (3)  Retirement Assets  11A.9
        • b.  Children  11A.10
          • (1)  Aaron  11A.11
          • (2)  Beatrice  11A.12
          • (3)  Catherine  11A.13
          • (4)  David  11A.14
        • c.  Grandchildren  11A.15
        • d.  Other Beneficiaries  11A.16
        • e.  Decisions and Implementation of Plan
          • (1)  Revocable Trust With Disclaimer Trust and Pourover Wills  11A.17
            • (a)  At the First Death  11A.18
            • (b)  At the Second Death  11A.19
          • (2)  Treatment of Specific Assets  11A.20
          • (3)  Gifts; Authority to Alter Estate Plan  11A.21
          • (4)  Actions After Plan Documents Signed  11A.22
      • 2.  Who Will Control Decisions About Assets
        • a.  Roles of Different Fiduciaries  11A.23
        • b.  Trustee of Revocable Trust Controls Trust Assets  11A.24
        • c.  Control of Nontrust Assets and Financial Matters
          • (1)  Each Has Control of Community Property While Both Alive  11A.25
          • (2)  Durable Power of Attorney  11A.26
          • (3)  Personal Care Decisions  11A.27
          • (4)  Nomination of Conservator  11A.28
          • (5)  Executor  11A.29
        • d.  Summary of Harold and Wendy’s Decisions  11A.30
    • E.  Formulating the Estate Plan for Health Care Decisions  11A.31
      • 1.  Statement of Wishes  11A.32
      • 2.  Agent Under Power of Attorney for Health Care Decisions  11A.33
  • III.  SAMPLE FORMS  11A.34
    • A.  Form: Revocable Trust  11A.35
    • B.  Form: Grant Deed  11A.36
    • C.  Form: General Assignment to Revocable Trust  11A.37
    • D.  Form: Wills of Harold Older and Wendy Older  11A.38
    • E.  Form: Attorney-Drafted Durable Powers of Attorney  11A.39

11B

Estate Planning for Clients Facing Future Long-Term Care Costs

Steven M. Ratner

Maya M. Pinchman

  • I.  INTRODUCTION TO LONG-TERM CARE COSTS  11B.1
  • II.  PLANNING FOR CLIENTS WHO MAY FACE LONG-TERM CARE COSTS
    • A.  Ethics
      • 1.  Overview  11B.2
        • a.  Attorney’s Duty to Client  11B.3
        • b.  Fee Splitting  11B.4
      • 2.  Clients With Diminished Capacity  11B.5
      • 3.  Identifying Client  11B.6
      • 4.  Malpractice Exposure  11B.7
      • 5.  Avoiding Elder Abuse Claims  11B.8
    • B.  Public Benefit; Means Tested Programs
      • 1.  Supplemental Security Income (SSI)  11B.9
      • 2.  Medi-Cal  11B.10
    • C.  Entitlement Programs  11B.11
      • 1.  Social Security Retirement  11B.12
      • 2.  Social Security Disability  11B.13
      • 3.  Medicare  11B.14
    • D.  Tax Considerations in Elder Law Practice  11B.15
      • 1.  Gift Tax  11B.16
      • 2.  Estate Tax  11B.17
      • 3.  Real Property Tax  11B.18
      • 4.  Income Tax  11B.19
    • E.  Drafting Revocable Trusts With Long-Term Care Planning Provisions
      • 1.  Available Assets  11B.20
      • 2.  Estate Recovery Program  11B.21
      • 3.  Need to Plan for Medi-Cal  11B.22
    • F.  When to Use Last Will and Testament as Primary Planning Vehicle  11B.23
    • G.  Powers of Attorney With Long-Term Care Planning Provisions
      • 1.  Drafting a Power of Attorney  11B.24
      • 2.  Powers to Include  11B.25
    • H.  Medi-Cal Estate Recovery
      • 1.  Basics  11B.26
      • 2.  Exemptions From Recovery  11B.27
      • 3.  Hardship Waivers  11B.28
      • 4.  Amendments to Estate Recovery Laws—Senate Bill 833  11B.28A
    • I.  Protection of Family Home  11B.29
      • 1.  Outright Transfer  11B.30
      • 2.  Retained Life Estate  11B.31
      • 3.  Irrevocable Income Only Trust  11B.32
  • III.  SAMPLE FORMS
    • A.  Form: Flat Fee Agreement  11B.33
    • B.  Form: Physician's Letter re Capacity  11B.34
    • C.  Form: Individual Revocable Trust  11B.35
    • D.  Form: Joint Revocable Trust  11B.36
    • E.  Form: Testamentary Special Needs Trust for Spouse  11B.37
    • F.  Form: Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney  11B.38
    • G.  Form: Quitclaim Deed for Outright Transfer  11B.39
    • H.  Form: Quitclaim Deed With Retained Life Estate  11B.40
    • I.  Form: Irrevocable Income Only Trust  11B.41

12

Completing and Implementing the Estate Plan

Carolyn E. Henel

Anne Bruner Nash

  • I.  COMPLETING THE PLAN
    • A.  Mailing Draft Documents to Client  12.1
    • B.  Obstacles to Completing the Plan
      • 1.  When Client Does Not Respond After Receiving Drafts  12.2
        • a.  Form: 3-Month Reminder Letter  12.3
        • b.  Form: 6-Month Reminder Letter  12.4
        • c.  Form: 1-Year Letter  12.5
      • 2.  Working With Client Who Is Seriously Ill  12.6
      • 3.  When Estate Plan Must Be Executed Outside of Office  12.7
      • 4.  Working With Client Who Cannot Complete the Estate Plan  12.8
      • 5.  When Important New Facts Come to Light After Drafts Completed  12.9
  • II.  HANDLING THE DOCUMENTS AFTER SIGNING  12.10
    • A.  Custody of Original Documents  12.11
      • 1.  Documents in Custody of Client
        • a.  In Client’s Home  12.12
        • b.  Safe Deposit Box  12.13
      • 2.  Documents in Custody of Attorney  12.14
      • 3.  Documents in Custody of Corporate Fiduciary  12.15
    • B.  Copies
      • 1.  Copies for Attorney and Client  12.16
      • 2.  Copies for Fiduciaries  12.17
      • 3.  Copies for Beneficiaries  12.18
    • C.  Destruction of Previous Documents  12.19
    • D.  Client Revisions  12.19A
  • III.  IMPLEMENTING THE PLAN  12.20
    • A.  Trust Funding
      • 1.  Purpose of Funding  12.21
      • 2.  Division of Responsibilities Between Attorney and Client  12.22
        • a.  Funding Memorandum to Client  12.23
        • b.  Form: Sample Funding Memorandum  12.24
      • 3.  Trust Certification  12.25
        • a.  Acceptance of Certification  12.26
        • b.  Form: Sample Certification  12.27
      • 4.  Forms Used to Transfer Assets to Trust  12.28
        • a.  Assignment  12.29
          • (1)  Form: Sample Assignment of Tangible Personal Property  12.30
          • (2)  Form: Sample Assignment of Promissory Note  12.31
          • (3)  Form: Sample Letter to Payor Regarding Payment on Promissory Note  12.32
          • (4)  Form: Sample General Assignment  12.33
        • b.  Transfer of Accounts
          • (1)  Letter of Instructions  12.34
          • (2)  Forms Supplied by Asset Holder  12.35
        • c.  Transfer of Stock Certificates and Treasury Bonds  12.36
      • 5.  Funding by Court Order  12.37
    • B.  Real Property Deeds  12.38
      • 1.  Grant Deed or Quitclaim Deed  12.39
      • 2.  Common Transfer Scenarios
        • a.  Transfers to Trust  12.40
        • b.  Married Couples  12.41
        • c.  Unmarried Persons  12.42
        • d.  Transfers to Third Parties by Joint Tenancy  12.43
        • e.  Revocable Transfer on Death (TOD) Deed  12.43A
      • 3.  Requirements for All Grant Deeds  12.44
        • a.  Grantor Name  12.45
        • b.  Grantee Name  12.46
        • c.  Description of the Property  12.47
        • d.  Assessor’s Parcel Number  12.47A
        • e.  Signature  12.48
      • 4.  Necessary Language in Deeds in Certain Situations
        • a.  Severing Joint Tenancy of Unmarried Persons  12.49
        • b.  Statement by Grantors of Intent to Transmute Property  12.50
        • c.  Statement by Grantees Regarding Community Property With Right of Survivorship  12.51
        • d.  Transfers of Partial Interests  12.51A
      • 5.  Recording the Deed and Filing Related Documents  12.52
        • a.  Required Recording Information  12.53
        • b.  Preliminary Change of Ownership Report  12.54
          • (1)  Obtaining PCOR Form  12.55
          • (2)  Completing PCOR  12.56
          • (3)  Form: Preliminary Change of Ownership Report (BOE-502-A)  12.57
        • c.  Change in Ownership Statement (BOE-502-AH)
          • (1)  Use of the Form  12.57A
          • (2)  Form: Change in Ownership Statement (BOE-502-AH)  12.57B
        • d.  Parent-Child or Grandparent-Grandchild Exclusion Form  12.58
          • (1)  Form: Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer Between Parent and Child (BOE-58-AH)  12.59
          • (2)  Form: Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer From Grandparent to Grandchild (BOE-58-G)  12.60
        • e.  Other Documents That May Be Required  12.61
    • C.  Beneficiary Designations  12.62
      • 1.  Retirement Plans  12.63
        • a.  Spouse as Beneficiary  12.64
        • b.  Minor as Beneficiary  12.65
        • c.  Form: Uniform Transfers to Minors Act Designation of Minor as Beneficiary  12.66
        • d.  Trust as Beneficiary  12.67
      • 2.  Life Insurance  12.68
      • 3.  Annuities  12.68A
      • 4.  Beneficiary Designation Forms
        • a.  Who Prepares Forms  12.69
        • b.  Form: Beneficiary Designation Memorandum to Client  12.70
        • c.  Completing Forms  12.71
        • d.  Confirmation of Acceptance of Beneficiary Designation  12.72
  • IV.  CONCLUDING ESTATE PLAN  12.73
    • A.  Transmittal Letter to Client  12.74
    • B.  Form: Sample Transmittal Letter  12.75
    • C.  Calendaring and Follow-Up Letters  12.76
    • D.  Ongoing Representation of Client  12.77

COMPLETE PLANS FOR SMALL AND MID-SIZE ESTATES

(1st Edition)

December 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

File Name

Book Section

Title

CH02

Chapter 2

Ethical Considerations

02-029

§2.29

Consent to Dual Representation—Short Form

02-030

§2.30

Consent to Dual Representation—Long Form

02-070

§2.70

Sample Paragraphs in Engagement Letter Confirming Family Member’s Role

CH05

Chapter 5

Problem Assets

05-056

§5.56

Power Over Digital Assets

CH06A

Chapter 6A

Estate Planning for Companion Animals and Pets

06A-012

§6A.12

Outright Gift in Will

06A-013

§6A.13

Outright Gift in Trust Agreement

06A-015

§6A.15

Outright Gift to Animal Protection Organization

06A-017

§6A.17

Trustee Provisions

06A-018

§6A.18

Appointment of Caretaker

06A-019

§6A.19

Appointment of Trust Protector

06A-022

§6A.22

Instruction Not to Separate Companion Animals

06A-024

§6A.24

Care for Companion Animals in Case of Settlor’s Incapacity

06A-027

§6A.27

Specific Distribution to Companion Animal Trust

06A-028

§6A.28

Distribution of Trust Residue to Companion Animal Trust

06A-032

§6A.32

Veterinarian Information

06A-034

§6A.34

Distribution of Residue to Charity

06A-037

§6A.37

Remainder Gift Does Not Qualify for Charitable Deduction

06A-038

§6A.38

Checklist: Client Interview

06A-039

§6A.39

Form: Emergency Contact

06A-041

§6A.41

Provisions for Single Settlor’s Trust, With Provisions for Care of Companion Animals

06A-042

§6A.42

Provisions for Married Couple’s Trust, Revised to Provide for Care of Companion Animals

CH07

Chapter 7

Planning Devices and Issues: An Overview

07-033

§7.33

Authorization for Care Provider to Consent to Medical or Dental Treatment of Minor (Fam C §6910)

07-034

§7.34

Caregiver’s Authorization Affidavit (Fam C §6552)

07-038

§7.38

Written Assurance of Parent (Prob C §3401(c)(2))

CH08

Chapter 8

Gathering Client Information

08-010

§8.10

Form: Client Questionnaire

CH09

Chapter 9

Plan for Unmarried Person Without Children

09-038

§9.38

Mary R. Smith Trust

09-039

§9.39

Schedule A

09-040

§9.40

Certification of the Mary R. Smith Trust

09-041

§9.41

Will of Mary R. Smith

09-042

§9.42

Financial Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney

09-044

§9.44

Transmittal Letter to Client

CH10

Chapter 10

Plan for Unmarried Person With Minor Children

10-031

§10.31

Nomination of Guardians

10-032

§10.32

Jane Johnson Trust

10-033

§10.33

Assignment to Trust

10-034

§10.34

Pourover Will

10-035

§10.35

Attorney-Drafted Durable Power of Attorney for Financial Management

10-036

§10.36

Advance Health Care Directive

10-037

§10.37

Transmittal Letter to Client

CH11

Chapter 11

Plan for Young Married Couple With Minor Children

11-027

§11.27

Grant Deed

11-028

§11.28

Will of Daniel Young

11-029

§11.29

Will of Susan Young

11-030

§11.30

Financial Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney

11-032

§11.32

Transmittal Letter to Client

CH11A

Chapter 11A

Plan for Married Couple With Adult Children

11A-035

§11A.35

Revocable Trust

11A-036

§11A.36

Grant Deed

11A-037

§11A.37

General Assignment to Revocable Trust

11A-038

§11A.38

Wills of Harold Older and Wendy Older

11A-039

§11A.39

Attorney-Drafted Durable Powers of Attorney

CH11B

Chapter 11B

Estate Planning for Clients Facing Future Long-Term Care Costs

11B-033

§11B.33

Flat Fee Agreement

11B-034

§11B.34

Physician's Letter re Capacity

11B-035

§11B.35

Individual Revocable Trust

11B-036

§11B.36

Joint Revocable Trust

11B-037

§11B.37

Testamentary Special Needs Trust for Spouse

11B-038

§11B.38

Uniform Statutory Form Power of Attorney

11B-039

§11B.39

Quitclaim Deed for Outright Transfer

11B-040

§11B.40

Quitclaim Deed With Retained Life Estate

11B-041

§11B.41

Irrevocable Income Only Trust

CH12

Chapter 12

Completing and Implementing the Estate Plan

12-003

§12.3

3-Month Reminder Letter

12-004

§12.4

6-Month Reminder Letter

12-005

§12.5

1-Year Letter

12-024

§12.24

Sample Funding Memorandum

12-027

§12.27

Sample Certification

12-030

§12.30

Sample Assignment of Tangible Personal Property

12-031

§12.31

Sample Assignment of Promissory Note

12-032

§12.32

Sample Letter to Payor Regarding Payment on Promissory Note

12-033

§12.33

Sample General Assignment

12-066

§12.66

Uniform Transfers to Minors Act Designation of Minor as Beneficiary

12-070

§12.70

Beneficiary Designation Memorandum to Client

12-075

§12.75

Sample Transmittal Letter

 

Selected Developments

December 2018 Update

The California Supreme Court revised and renumbered the California Rules of Professional Conduct, effective November 1, 2018. All the Rule changes have been highlighted and updated throughout the publication. See chap 2 (Ethical Considerations). See also §§4.7, 4.8, 4.18, 4.21, 11B.2, 11B.4, 12.2, 12.64.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Pub L 115–97, 131 Stat 2054) was signed into law on December 22, 2017, and has sweeping changes relating to income taxes, but only affects the estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax by an increase in the applicable exclusion amount (AEA) to $11.18 million for the year 2018. The AEA will continue to be adjusted through 2025, but in 2026, it will revert back to the provisions under the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. The maximum estate and gift tax rate remains at 40 percent. Chapter 3 highlights the changes made under this Act. See also §§5.22, 5.57, 6.1– 6.30, 11.6, 11A.7, 11B.15.

The annual gift tax exclusion under IRC §2503(b) has increased to $15,000 for 2018 and adjusted annually for inflation. Rev Proc 2018–18, 2018–10 Int Rev Bull 392. See §§3.13, 3.20, 3.58, 6.3, 6.55A, 7.40, 11B.16.

Nonqualified stock options (NQSOs) receive slightly less favorable income tax treatment than incentive stock options (ISOs). However, under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Pub L 115–97, 131 Stat 2054), a “qualified employee” may elect to defer the income attributable to “qualified stock” under a NQSO of an “eligible corporation” for up to 5 years. IRC §83(i). See §5.42 for a detailed explanation of the new election.

An increasingly important issue is the handling of a client’s digital assets and accounts. The Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act, codified at Prob C §§870–884, provides procedures for a decedent’s personal representative to access and manage digital assets and electronic communications and requires a custodian of digital assets, except under certain circumstances, to comply with the personal representative’s request for disclosure of digital assets or to terminate an account. See Prob C §877. See §§5.55–5.56.

Forms, samples, and Medi-Cal limits have been updated to reflect recent legislation and trends. See §§5.56, 6.44, 6.70, 7.34, 8.10, 9.40, 9.42, 10.32, 10.34, 10.36–10.37, 12.24, 12.33, 12.66.

In our 2017 release, we added a new chapter (Estate Planning for Companion Animals and Pets) to the publication and received a good response. This chapter offers a comprehensive legal overview and suggestions for drafting companion animal trust provisions. See chap 6A.

Effective January 1, 2018, for costs associated with probate, an additional $75 is charged at the time of recording for every real estate instrument, paper, or notice under the recent Building Homes and Jobs Act. See Govt C §27388.1 and Health & S C §§50470–50475. See §§9.10, 12.52.

About the Authors

ELIZABETH ANNE BIRD worked for many years as an attorney specializing in trust and estate planning, estate trust and estate administration, and trust and estate litigation. She received her B.A. in 1972 from the University of California, Berkeley, and her J.D. in 1978 from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

RICHARD A. BURGER is a sole practitioner in Petaluma, specializing in estate planning and administration. He received his B.A. in 1979 from Sonoma State University, and his J.D. in 1983 from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. Mr. Burger is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization.

SUSANNE B. COHEN, the author of the Medi-Cal Planning portion of chapter 6, is an attorney in private practice in San Francisco, specializing in conservatorships and trust administration, elder financial abuse litigation, long-term care and estate planning, and probate litigation. She received her B.A. from Vassar College and her J.D. from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles. A former legal services attorney specializing in aging and disability issues, she has served as a staff attorney at Legal Assistance for Seniors in Oakland, California Rural Legal Assistance in Modesto, and The Arizona Center for Disability Law.

MONICA DELL’OSSO is a partner in the firm of Burnham Brown in Oakland, where she heads the Trusts and Estates Practice Group. She received her B.A. in 1971 from St. Mary-of-the-Woods College, her J.D. in 1981 from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, and a Ph.D. in history in 1989 from the University of Virginia. Ms. Dell’Osso is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel and is a past chair of the Estate Planning, Trust, and Probate Law Section of the Alameda County Bar Association. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the UCLA/CEB Estate Planning Institute and a former member of the Executive Committee of the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California. She is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization.

ROBERT L. HARRISON is a partner in the firm of Keegin Harrison LLP in San Rafael, California, where his practice is concentrated in the areas of estate planning, estate and trust administration, and real estate law. He received his B.A. cum laude from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1974 and his J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 1977. Mr. Harrison is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization, and is a member of the State Bar Sections on Trusts and Estates and on Real Property Law.

CAROLYN E. HENEL is a partner at Roisman Henel LLP, Oakland. She represents individuals in estate planning, probate and trust administration, family business planning, and charitable giving. In addition, she advises trustees, executors, and beneficiaries in the administration of decedents’ estates, preparation of estate tax returns, and the administration of revocable and irrevocable trusts. Ms. Henel received her B.A. in 1992 from Yale University and her J.D. in 1996 from the University of Virginia School of Law. Ms. Henel is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Volunteer Legal Services Corporation (VLSC). She is a member of the East Bay Trusts & Estate Lawyers and the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California. Ms. Henel has been selected by her peers and the publishers of Law & Politics and San Francisco Magazine as one of Northern California’s “Super Lawyers” from 2004.

SANDY KASTEN is a sole practitioner with offices in Arnold and Berkeley. Her practice areas are estate planning and estate and fiduciary tax planning and compliance. Ms. Kasten received her B.A. from San Francisco State University, her J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, and her MBA in Taxation from Golden Gate University. She serves as Treasurer of the Calaveras County Bar Association.

ANNE BRUNER NASH is of counsel to the firm of Roisman Henel LLP in Oakland. Her practice focuses on estate planning, probate, and trust administration. Ms. Nash received her B.A. with Distinction in 1984 from Stanford University and her J.D. in 1987 from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. Ms. Nash is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. She is a member of the Estate Planning Council of the East Bay, the East Bay Tax Club, and the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California. She is a former chair of the Elder Law subsection of the Alameda County Bar Association.

JERILYN PAIK is the principal of the Law Offices of Jerilyn Paik in Sacramento. She is certified as a specialist in her principal areas of practice, which are estate planning, probate, and trust administration. Her certification is by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. Ms. Paik also serves as a mediator/neutral and represents clients in trust and probate disputed matters. Before opening her own law firm in 1994, Ms. Paik was a partner in a major Sacramento law firm. She received her J.D. from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles in 1979, graduating with honors, and was a member of the Loyola Law Review. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California.

MAYA M. PINCHMAN graduated from the University of California, San Diego in 2006 with a B.A. in Political Science. She received her J.D. in 2010 from California Western School of Law, graduating magna cum laude. While in law school Ms. Pinchman received Academic Achievement Awards in Trial Practice and Professional Responsibility & Negotiations, and tutored first-year law students. Ms. Pinchman is Member at Large of the Elder Law Section of the San Diego County Bar Association as well as a member of the Trusts and Estates Committee of the State Bar of California Trusts and Estates Section. Ms. Pinchman was a volunteer for the Jewish Family Services Bikkur Holim Friendly Visitor Program for over a year, until the birth of her daughter in 2013.

SANDRA B. PRICE is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization and is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC). She is a partner with Sideman & Bancroft LLP in San Francisco. Ms. Price is a former member and advisor to the Executive Committee of the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar; former Chair of the Bar Association of San Francisco’s Estate Planning, Probate and Trust Section; and former Director and President of the San Francisco Estate Planning Council, where she previously served as president. Ms. Price received her law degree from the University of San Francisco and her master’s degree (Taxation) from Golden Gate University.

NANCY D. RASCH is an attorney in private practice in San Francisco, specializing in conservatorships, guardianships, probate and trust administration, and estate planning. She received her B.A. in 1974 from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her J.D. in 1980 from Santa Clara University School of Law. Her clients include both individuals and private professional fiduciaries and she frequently serves as court-appointed counsel to conservatees and minors. Before entering private practice she was a staff attorney at Legal Assistance to the Elderly, where she specialized in elder abuse cases. She has been a frequent speaker on elder law issues, is past chair of the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention, and serves on the San Francisco probate court pro bono mediation panel.

STEVEN M. RATNER is the founder of Ratner & Pinchman, APLC. He is certified in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. He graduated first in his class from the University of Oregon School of Law and was a member of the Order of the Coif, and Associate Editor of the Oregon Law Review. Mr. Ratner received an LL.M. in Taxation from New York University School of Law where he was a student editor of the Tax Law Review and recipient of the Harry J. Rudnick Memorial Award. Mr. Ratner’s work experience includes a 1-year clerkship with the Honorable Herbert Y.C. Choy of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Honolulu, Hawaii. He served as an Adjunct Professor of the San Diego State University Seminar in Estate Planning. Mr. Ratner serves on the Board of Directors of Seacrest Holdings Corporation, a not for profit, that supports the activities of Seacrest Village Retirement Communities. Mr. Ratner is admitted to practice in California and New York, is a member of the San Diego County Bar Association, and is a member, and former co-chair, of the Elder Law Section of the San Diego County Bar Association.

CATHERINE (KITTY) RAYE-WONG is certified as a specialist in Estate Planning, Trust, and Probate Law by the State Bar of California. A prior judicial advisor for San Mateo County Superior Court, she received her B.A. in English from the College of Notre Dame (now Notre Dame de Namur University) in Belmont, California in 1988, her J.D. from San Francisco Law School in 1993, and her LL.M. in Taxation from Golden Gate University School of Law in 1997. She is the owner of Raye-Wong & Associates (previously the Law Office of Richard W. Henson), Attorneys at Law, a specialized full-service estate planning, probate, and trust firm in San Carlos, California. She is a frequent speaker on the related topics of estate planning, a member of the Trusts and Estates Sections of the State Bar of California and San Mateo County Bar Association (past co-chair), and a director for the Conference of Delegates of California Bar Associations.

DONALD L. SCOGGINS is partner in the firm of Scoggins & Vo, Los Angeles. He represents clients in the areas of probate, conservatorship, decedent estate administration, trust administration, and estate planning. Mr. Scoggins received his B.A. with High Distinction from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln in 1984 and his J.D. from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles in 1993. He lectures to community groups on estate planning and elder law issues and has been a past guest lecturer on elder law for UCLA’s masters of social work program.

LYNN SEARLE practices trusts and estate law in San Francisco, specializing in estate planning, trust administration, probate, and financial elder abuse. Ms. Searle earned her J.D. at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law and her LL.M. in Taxation at Golden Gate University. A former prosecutor, Ms. Searle has significant experience with elder abuse and has spoken on the subject as it relates to estate planning for the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, the Bar Association of San Francisco, the Marin Bar Association, Golden Gate University, and Legal InCite (CNET Radio, San Francisco).

KEVIN URBATSCH, the author of the Estate Planning to Benefit Disabled Persons portion of chapter 6, is a shareholder of Myers Urbatsch P.C., San Francisco. He received his B.S. from Truman State University in 1988 and his J.D. from St. Louis University College of Law in 1993. He teaches and writes extensively on the unique planning needs for individuals with disabilities. He is a member of the Trusts and Estates Section of the State Bar of California, the Bar Association of San Francisco, the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform.

MARY K. VO is a partner in the firm of Scoggins & Vo, Los Angeles. Her practice is limited to conservatorship, limited conservatorship, guardianship, estate planning, trust, and probate matters. Ms. Vo received her B.A. in English from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1990 and her J.D. from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles in 1993. She has served on the Executive Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association Trusts and Estates Section. Ms. Vo has participated actively in the Los Angeles Superior Court Probate Volunteer Panel.

About the 2018 Update Authors

ROBERT BARTON, update coauthor of chapter 6A, is an attorney in the Private Wealth Services Group at Holland & Knight. He focuses on complex trust and estate litigation, and trust and estate administration as well as conservatorship and guardianship matters for individuals, families and charities. Mr. Barton also handles breach of fiduciary duty and elder abuse matters, will and trust disputes, and contested conservatorships and guardianships in federal, state, and tribal courts throughout the country. Mr. Barton is currently a member of the Holland & Knight’s National Diversity Committee and the chair of the firm's Native American Affinity Group.

SARAH S. BROOMER, an update coauthor of chapters 4 and 5, is an attorney with the law firm of Hinojosa & Wallet, LLP in Los Angeles. Her practice emphasizes estate planning, conservatorships, and trust and estate litigation. She received her B.A. degree in political science in 2004 from the University of California, Berkeley, and her J.D. degree in 2008 from Southwestern University School of Law. Mrs. Broomer was a judicial extern for the Honorable Aviva K. Bobb (Ret.), the supervising probate judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court. She is on the executive committee of the Beverly Hills Bar Association Trusts and Estates section.

STEFANIE S. CUTLER, update author of chapter 10, has been employed at Bloom & Ruttenberg since 2007. Her practice focuses on trust and estate and fiduciary litigation as well as trust and estate administration. She also handles contested and noncontested conservatorship and guardianship matters. She earned two B.A. degrees from the University of Southern California in 2004, in Political Science and Environmental Studies. She received her J.D. from Arizona State University in 2007 with a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology and was a visiting student at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. Ms. Cutler was a judicial extern for the Honorable Susan R. Bolton, United States District Court, Arizona Division and for the Honorable Joe W. Hilberman (Ret.), Los Angeles Superior Court. Ms. Cutler’s article, The AABB’S Autologous Blood Donation Suggested Guidance: Autologous Blood, HIV, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, was published in Jurimetrics: Journal of Law, Science, and Technology in 2006. She is the current Chair of the Executive Committee of the Trust & Estate Committee of the Beverly Hills Bar Association. In addition, she serves as a coeditor of the Trusts & Estates Bulletin, a monthly e-publication of the Los Angeles County Bar Association and is a member of the executive committee for the Trusts and Estates Section of the Los Angeles County Bar Association.

LINDA ESHOE, an update coauthor of chapters 8 and 9, is a Senior Deputy County Counsel with the Office of the Los Angeles County Counsel and currently practices in probate. She previously specialized in litigation and employment matters. Ms. Eshoe received her B.S. degree from the University of Southern California and her J.D. degree from Southwestern University School of Law. She belongs to the Trusts and Estates sections of the California State Bar and the Los Angeles County Bar Association, in addition to the Litigation, Inn of Courts, and Labor and Employment sections of the State Bar of California and the Los Angeles County Bar Association.

ROBERT L. HARRISON is an update coauthor of chapter 6; see his biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

CAROLYN E. HENEL is an update coauthor of chapter 12; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

BONNIE LANDLES-DOWLING, update author of chapter 7, is an attorney at Keegin Harrison LLP. Her practice focuses on estate and tax planning and trust and estate administration. She advises her estate and tax planning clients on a wide range of issues, from the most basic—wills, trusts, and powers of attorney—to complex and high net-worth estate and tax planning including special needs trusts, family limited partnerships, S corporations, limited liability companies, irrevocable life insurance trusts, and intentionally defective grantor trusts. She earned her bachelors degree from the University of the Pacific and earned her J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

LAWRENCE M. LEBOWSKY, an update coauthor of chapters 8 and 9, practices in Los Angeles. Mr. Lebowsky is certified by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law. He focuses on administration and litigation of trust, estate and conservatorship matters, estate and income taxation, and tax-exempt organizations. He is a member of the Los Angeles Superior Court’s Probate Volunteer Panel and is appointed often as legal counsel and Guardian ad litem in probate, trust, and conservatorship cases. Mr. Lebowsky received his B.A. degree in Economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, his J.D. degree from Southwestern Law School, and his LL.M. degree in Taxation from Boston University School of Law. He is a Member of the Trusts and Estates and Taxation sections of the State Bar of California, and the Los Angeles County and Beverly Hills Bar Associations. Mr. Lebowsky served as a Commissioner on the Estate Planning, Probate and Trust Law Advisory Commission to the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. He is a member of the Adjunct Faculty at Southwestern Law School, teaching Federal Income Tax. He also volunteers as a Settlement Officer for probate cases in the Los Angeles Superior Court.

ANNE BRUNER NASH is an update coauthor of chapter 12; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

JERILYN PAIK is an update coauthor of chapter 9; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

MAYA M. PINCHMAN is an update coauthor of chapter 11B; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

SANDRA B. PRICE is the update author of chapters 11 and 11A; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

STEVEN M. RATNER is an update coauthor of chapter 11B; see his biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

LYNN SEARLE is an update author of chapter 2; see her biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

KEVIN URBATSCH is an update coauthor of chapter 6; see his biography in the About the Authors section of this book.

ERIC R. YAMAMOTO, an update coauthor of chapters 4 and 6A, has his own firm in West Los Angeles. He focuses his practice on probate, conservatorship, and trust matters. Mr. Yamamoto received his B.S. from the University of Southern California School of Business in 1971 and his J.D. from Loyola University School of Law in 1974. He belongs to the Trusts and Estates Sections of the Santa Monica Bar Association, Los Angeles County Bar Association, and State Bar of California. He is a cochair of the Santa Monica Bar Association Probate, Trust, and Estate Planning Section. Mr. Yamamoto has taught at the University of West Los Angeles School of Law and at UCLA Extension, and he has been a speaker at numerous seminars sponsored by the Los Angeles County Bar Association. He periodically serves as an interviewer for the California State Controller’s Advisory Probate Referee.

OnLAW System Requirements:
Desktop: Windows XP, 7 or 8, Mac OS 10.8
Mobile: iOS6, iOS7, Android 4.2
Firefox, Chrome, IE and Safari browsers

Note: OnLAW may work with some devices running older versions of these Operating Systems or Windows RT; however, functionality is not guaranteed.

Please see FAQs for more details.
Products specifications
PRODUCT GROUP Publication
PRACTICE AREA Estate Planning
Products specifications
PRODUCT GROUP Publication
PRACTICE AREA Estate Planning